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Old 12-18-2019, 06:32 PM #1
Jayjangle
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Troubleshooting leaks on a pump with Co2

So I just put a slice pump kit on my Trilogy Pro and upon gassing it up there was immediately a pretty big leak.

Compressed air is hard to come by these days, so was wondering if it would damage or be bad for my autococker when used for simple maintenance?

If the answer is no [about being damaged] I’d be pretty relieved. If so I’ll manage but wanted to see what you guys think 🙂

Thanks!
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Old 12-18-2019, 06:44 PM #2
Clunkycocker
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Keeping the gun pointing up will help keep liquid from going into it. A small gauge on the front block can help you make sure that your input pressure is consistent so you aren't chasing your tail troubleshooting. Big leak probably means the input pressure was a bit low. Make sure it's cocked before you air it up though so the valve can seal without having to fight against the hammer spring.
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Old 12-19-2019, 06:47 AM #3
tacxplosion
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Location: Guatemala (for real)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayjangle View Post
So I just put a slice pump kit on my Trilogy Pro and upon gassing it up there was immediately a pretty big leak.

Compressed air is hard to come by these days, so was wondering if it would damage or be bad for my autococker when used for simple maintenance?

If the answer is no [about being damaged] I’d be pretty relieved. If so I’ll manage but wanted to see what you guys think 🙂

Thanks!
Yes, you can use CO2, even as your main propellant (the regulator will need to be adjusted though), WGP regs are some of the most CO2 tolerant.

As for the leak, where's it coming from?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clunkycocker View Post
A small gauge on the front block can help you make sure that your input pressure is consistent so you aren't chasing your tail troubleshooting.
It's a trilogy, there's no port for a gauge. Though you can easily make a reg tester with a spare duckbill ASA, a gauge and a plug (or better yet, a bleed valve).

Last edited by tacxplosion : 12-19-2019 at 06:51 AM.
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Old 12-27-2019, 07:32 AM #4
Dk-79
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Join Date: May 2004
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Getting an anti syphon tank is a safe bet.

Cock the hammer before screwing in the tank.
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Old 12-28-2019, 09:52 PM #5
Furtlestyle
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Without knowing where the leak is coming from, it could be that the pump rod guide is not sealing in the trilogy front end. Check the oring on the guide rod for damage and make sure its screwed in enough. Some oil on it won't hurt.
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