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Old 08-05-2017, 08:05 AM #1
jackerbes
 
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
1998 Spyder .68 Parts

I have this Spyder paint ball gun that was new in about 1998 and am looking for parts to rebuild it. The people that own the Spyder brand now say they can't help me.

Does anyone know of a good source for parts of vintage paintball guns?

Thanks for any help.

Jack
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:51 AM #2
Fubarius
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These guys have quite a few parts on hand, but not all...

http://www.paintball-parts.com/Kingm...arts-s/211.htm

Some later generation parts are compatible, others are not.

Your gun looks intact, which parts are you looking for?
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Old 08-06-2017, 05:12 AM #3
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Thanks for the link and reply.

If I leave a tank on it it loses all pressure overnight. So I want to go through it and replace the O rings, seals, and other parts that seal the air system. I have a image with the parts breakdown but have not taken it apart yet, want to get parts first if I can.

When I put a HPA 9 oz. tank on it with 800 PSI I can get 15 shots or so out of it and that is enough to make it usable. I use it at home for chasing critters away from the back deck and bird feeders (cats, skunks, raccoons, turkeys, bears, etc.). All shots are non-lethal and non-injurious, just to scare them off.

I do my own fills on the HPA at home. I use two 9 oz. steel and one 12 oz. aluminum bottles filled from a SCBA tank at 3000 PSI. But I'll never put more than 800 PSI on any bottle.

I'll give that link a try, thanks again!

Jack
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Old 08-06-2017, 06:03 PM #4
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Well, the guns really aren't designed to be gassed up constantly. They could be considered "in perfect working order" and still not hold air overnight.

But anyways, the parts where it could be leaking out from are Front cap o-ring, the front most o-ring on the valve body, valve cup seal, and where the hoses screw into the body and ASA (Air Source Adaptor, doodad the tank screws into), and also the o-ring around the valve of the tank.

Also, the 9oz and 12oz tanks are meant for liquid CO2, NOT HPA. You are keeping them under the working pressure of the tanks (which is actually 1800psi, but the gun won't like that), so that's good, but I think we can alter your setup a bit for a reasonable cost and have you better off.

If you picked up an actual HPA tank, even one as tiny as this one...
https://www.ansgear.com/Tippmann_13_...tank133000.htm
...you can fill it all the way to 3000psi from your SCBA, and the regulator on the tank will bring the output pressure down to 800psi for the gun to work. You'll get around 150 shots easy.

But you really shouldn't leave the gun gassed up constantly, so lets add a way to turn off the gas to the gun, like this...
https://www.ansgear.com/Valken_Ultra...raasaonoff.htm
...this goes inbetween the gun and the tank. You turn the outside ring to turn on the gas to shoot, then you can turn it off when you're not, and the tank should remain perfectly full.
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:33 PM #5
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Quote:
Well, the guns really aren't designed to be gassed up constantly. They could be considered "in perfect working order" and still not hold air overnight.

But anyways, the parts where it could be leaking out from are Front cap o-ring, the front most o-ring on the valve body, valve cup seal, and where the hoses screw into the body and ASA (Air Source Adapter, doodad the tank screws into), and also the o-ring around the valve of the tank.
Wow! Thanks for your really helpful reply. I must be dumb to think that the gun should hold air better.

I am looking at this parts diagram:

http://paintball.paintball-parts.com...%20Diagram.pdf

and it appears like I need a number of O-rings of four different sizes and the cup seal and those would be all the parts that are inclined to wear and age. And those should be easy to find and not hard to replace (I'm an ex-gunsmith/machinist and have the tools/skills).

Quote:
Also, the 9 oz. and 12 oz. tanks are meant for liquid CO2, NOT HPA. You are keeping them under the working pressure of the tanks (which is actually 1800psi, but the gun won't like that), so that's good, but I think we can alter your setup a bit for a reasonable cost and have you better off.
I really studied this using CO2 bottles for HPA thing a lot and am pretty confident that is no danger in using these CO2 bottles for HPA as long as I am doing my own fills and keep them down to 800 PSI. Nor does it break any hard rules that I can find, just opinions. I won't use them when/if they are out of certification and/or if there is any visible damage on them.

I am unable to find a good reason why CO2 bottles should not be used for HPA as I am using them (i.e., filled at home and never over 800 PSI). Do you know of one?

If clarifies things, I have to drive 30 miles round trip to get a CO2 fill... And that will never happen again.

I am perfectly happy with the 30 or so shots from the smaller 9 oz. bottle and those will get the most use. I can walk into my shop and top one up to 800 PSI in a matter of minutes. These bottles will never see CO2 again or be filled at a CO2 or HPA fill station anywhere outside of my home.

Quote:
If you picked up an actual HPA tank, even one as tiny as this one...
https://www.ansgear.com/Tippmann_13_...tank133000.htm
...you can fill it all the way to 3000psi from your SCBA, and the regulator on the tank will bring the output pressure down to 800psi for the gun to work. You'll get around 150 shots easy.
I appreciate the recommendation and when/if I need to get another bottle I'll consider one like that. I am 75 now, don't know that service life in years is a major concern for me any more....

Quote:
But you really shouldn't leave the gun gassed up constantly, so lets add a way to turn off the gas to the gun, like this...
https://www.ansgear.com/Valken_Ultra...raasaonoff.htm
...this goes inbetween the gun and the tank. You turn the outside ring to turn on the gas to shoot, then you can turn it off when you're not, and the tank should remain perfectly full.
Genius!! I don't know how I missed those on/off adapters in browsing parts and fittings listings but I did! And that is what I will do.

I knew that I could unscrew the bottle overnight and it would only lose a little air but find that awkward and don't like the wear and tear issues on doing that often. Most days, one bottle or air is all I'll need and with two bottles I'll have a full one on hand all time.

So all I have to do now is run down those O-rings and that cup seal and I'll be ready to take this apart and freshen things up.

I have a habit of lubricating O-rings lightly, I would use a benign non-petrolem O-ring lube lightly at assembly and occasionally put a very light coat on the visible O-ring on the bottle. Is that a bad idea?

Thanks again for your very helpful reply!!

Jack
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Old 08-07-2017, 09:39 PM #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackerbes View Post
I am unable to find a good reason why CO2 bottles should not be used for HPA as I am using them (i.e., filled at home and never over 800 PSI). Do you know of one?
Mostly safety of course. Got to go lowest common denominator when giving on-line advice, no offence intended. Always the small chance you'll have a sneezing fit or something in the middle of a filling session and dump the full 3k into the tank and blow the burst disk. Of if you don't blow the burst disk, you don't notice and screw the nearly 3k filled tank onto the gun and blow the fitting off of the hose. It's not fun (been there, done that, though a wildly different situation).

And of course, it's all in what you consider acceptable performance. 800psi in a unregulated tank mean the pressure in the tank and coming out of the tank drops with each shot. So velocity and re-cock reliability goes down with each shot. A proper HPA system has a pressure regulator on the tank which is filled to 3000psi and regulated down to 800psi. As you shoot the pressure in the tank goes down, but the output pressure remains at 800psi, giving you consistent, reliable shots one after another. Personally, I'd hate having to aim higher and higher with each shot, even if I am just scaring off some rabbit.



Quote:
So all I have to do now is run down those O-rings and that cup seal and I'll be ready to take this apart and freshen things up.

I have a habit of lubricating O-rings lightly, I would use a benign non-petrolem O-ring lube lightly at assembly and occasionally put a very light coat on the visible O-ring on the bottle. Is that a bad idea?

Thanks again for your very helpful reply!!

Jack
You got the oiling step pretty much perfect. Paintball gun specific oil is recommended, but air tool oil, Hoppes No. 9 gun oil (in the orange squeeze bottle, not the aerosol, and NO solvent), and even some automatic transmission fluid will do the job.

Though on the non-moving o-rings (valve body, front cap, etc.) you can use something thicker and it won't hurt performance. Some DOW 33 grease works quite well here, and may seal a little better.
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Old 11-05-2017, 08:48 PM #7
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All the #9 orings are the same as your tank o-ring. I use the Ninja tank o-rings for these because they seem to last longer and I like red, which is a moot point I know, I know...

The #19 o-ring is a spyder specific oring for the striker. It looks nearly the same size as the #9s but is Brown and more flexible and a little looser.

The #37C oring can be optional if you use teflon on those threads, this is what I have on my .68.

The barrel o-ring is also optional. It's really just to insure you don't over tighten and the barrel doesn't loosen with game play. Seeing as you're sitting on your porch or what not, you don't need to worry about it.

Pay attention to the valve pin (#13) and insure the flat part is facing down. Do not over tighten the valve body screw (#15) or it won't allow the valve pin to move. You also want to screw that in after you have the entire valve body assembly in place (10,11,12,13,14).
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