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Old 12-27-2020, 10:33 PM #1
ebrown1986
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
raspberry pi

any ideas on how to implement this open ended type of device into paintball?
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Old Yesterday, 09:41 AM #2
ghilliesuit
 
 
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Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Pennysylvania
 has been a member for 10 years
Sure, it could be possible.

First, you would need a device small enough to fit wherever it would be placed on the marker. Most likely inside a grip frame, but possible somewhere else. For example, it could be mounted on the exterior of the marker itself (would require protection). Or maybe hidden inside a hopper enclosure. Raspberry Pi (4, 400, etc...) are relatively large. But something like the raspberry pi pico is much smaller.

Second, it would need to have a suitable powersource. This, of course, would depend on the device chosen. This is where micro controllers shine vs. computers. The Pico will draw approximately 88 mA in use @ 5V. In comparison, a Raspi 4 will consume around 600 mA @ 5V just with the board being active, but requires ability to draw up to several amps. Again, the micro controller would be the easier route. The raspberry Pi 4 (or similar) is still possible - but the power requirements will effect things like useful time of operation, weight from batteries, and even a larger foot print.

Then you would need to decide how many, and what type of, input/outputs you need. Micro switch for trigger, thats one digital. Every solenoid - an additional output channel. Do you want a display - additional outputs. Buttons to interface - inputs. LEDs - outputs.

Then once you have selected a board with suitable I/O - you go circuit by circuit sorting it out. For example, can the device output enough current engage a solenoid? If not, a relay, transistor, etc... may need to be added to the circuit to protect the device and allow for sufficient current. Circuits with LEDs will need current limiting resistors (most likely). A suitable battery will need to be selected (5V offers many options due to this being common cell phone input voltage).

Once you have this mostly worked out on paper - take it to a breadboard. Build the circuits out one by one.

Now program and test each circuit individual. LEDs can be commanded on/off. Solenoids can be engaged. A power switch controls everything being powered on or off. You get the idea.

Finally you would program your logic and test until satisfied. Start simple (a trigger click activates the solenoid) and work your way up.

Once you are happy - then you need to consider how to mount this into/onto the marker. Use your imagination. Dont expect to be fully happy with your first go. Just get it working and physically on there. 3D print something, or make it out of toothpicks. Consider using things like prototype boards to condense your circuit down.

Above all - have fun. Learn. If this is for your main marker - i recommend getting something else to work on. Don't miss out on playing because your working on something.

I think the new Raspberry Pi Pico would be a good place to start - but there are many good options out there. Much of it will depend on your willingness to learn (assuming you dont already know how to) electrical theory, soldering, programming, etc... You could definitely create some kind of LandWarrior box mounted to your body and run a cable to your marker for power (similar to a remote line). Hell you could even run your inputs/outputs from the box and just have your marker on a connector. Dont be afraid to think outside the box and remember that you can refine as you go.

Good luck, and PM me if you ever wanna bounce an idea off someone.

Last edited by ghilliesuit : Yesterday at 09:46 AM.
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Old Yesterday, 10:06 AM #3
ghilliesuit
 
 
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Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Pennysylvania
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Oh, i forgot to mention. Start with a "Build Requirements Sheet". Formalize your goals. Something like the following:

-Inputs Required: ## (list them)
-Outputs Required: ## (list them)
-Desired operational timeframe per "charge" (i.e. 4 hours of continuous use or a month before charging/changing batteries)
-Desired spacial requirements (ie fits in grip of marker, mounted on sight rail, what ever)
-Desired maximum weight added (1 lb, 10lbs, what ever)
-What ever else you, the design engineer, find important

Then choose a device based on your requirements, if possible. If you are limited to a device you already have - you can still try to hold to these as goals. Even if they require refinement past the first functional design.

Hope this helps.
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