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Old 02-09-2016, 10:50 AM #1
bigdee
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CNC question

With the advancement of 3D scanning and availability of Home CNC machines, would it be possible to replicate a rare gun body if you were able to get your hands on an original model to scan? Or is this completely out of the range of what is economically/technically feasible at this time? #thoughtswhileshoveling
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Old 02-09-2016, 01:16 PM #2
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From my experience with this, It would be harder than one would expect.
The part scanners will record specific points of the part surface, matching the resolution of the scanner (IOW, no complex milling patterns with an low-end scanner). Next, these points need to be "stitched" together to create a surface model (bit more complex than a typical solid model). From there, it can be milled but would probably require a powerful CAM software, since the geometry data is scanned and not CAD created, it's not "smooth" (not sure if that makes sense).

Another issue is that it the scanner will not have the internal geometry. A clamshell marker like a 98 custom would be fine, but something like an old autococker body would have to be measured in other ways. Lastly, you probably wouldn't be able to sell any marker created for copyright reasons, unless you make you're own notable modifications.

In short, to answer you're question, yes recreating a rare marker is technically possible. No, it is economically feasible, especially considering the equipment / software to achieve the necessary precision.
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Old 02-09-2016, 01:22 PM #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twaltz628 View Post
From my experience with this, It would be harder than one would expect.
The part scanners will record specific points of the part surface, matching the resolution of the scanner (IOW, no complex milling patterns with an low-end scanner). Next, these points need to be "stitched" together to create a surface model (bit more complex than a typical solid model). From there, it can be milled but would probably require a powerful CAM software, since the geometry data is scanned and not CAD created, it's not "smooth" (not sure if that makes sense).

Another issue is that it the scanner will not have the internal geometry. A clamshell marker like a 98 custom would be fine, but something like an old autococker body would have to be measured in other ways. Lastly, you probably wouldn't be able to sell any marker created for copyright reasons, unless you make you're own notable modifications.

In short, to answer you're question, yes recreating a rare marker is technically possible. No, it is economically feasible, especially considering the equipment / software to achieve the necessary precision.
That is the answer that I expected. I had no plan for what i would do with the "cloned" guns, I just thought it was an interesting idea. I was thinking more along the lines of taking a old classic Intimidator body and making a ripper more than making a gun from a block of solid aluminum.

Thanks for the explanation, it does make sense
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Old 02-09-2016, 02:08 PM #4
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It would probably be cheaper to have someone create a new model by hand than to reiterate over and over again with a scanner or even a CMM to get the geometry. They usually output point clouds, and getting high resolution is extremely time intensive.
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Old 02-09-2016, 08:03 PM #5
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If you just want to remake a body similar to, but not an exact replica of an old body, it shouldn't be too hard. Internal geometries are usually simple enough to just measure and re-model in CAD. Outside cosmetics can be done by eye to get something close to the original.
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Old 02-10-2016, 06:45 AM #6
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With appropriate surfacing tools (not the junk in solidworks) and a high enough point cloud resolution you can probably get a very accurate mesh. You'll always have to go back and correct some of it, but that's not difficult either. I agree with Tyrone though, because I think just eyeballing it will be sufficient and probably a lot more time effective.
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