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Old 04-07-2010, 01:29 AM #22
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Originally Posted by p8ballstimpy View Post
as a fellow culinary graduate (CSCA-pasadena, ca) and current head chef of a catering company i am glad that you guys started a thread like this. i always thought that the food section need some upstanding posters to answer these types of questions. if your guys don't mind i would like to help you guys out with some of these questions. i also had some other ideas for some stickies, basic culinary terms, methods and recipes (sautee, bbq, grill, roux, stock, etc)

thanks

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Old 04-07-2010, 05:46 AM #23
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Doesnt taste bad by itself but def not eating it that way in large quantities. Out of curiosity, why does it say for them to be rinsed thoroughly. Not that I doubt it, just wondering.
There's a naturally found chemical in it that tends to be on the bitter side. Not sure if you noticed it or not, but the more you rinse it, the better it'll taste.


As far as using it to cook with, yeah, you can absolutely use it in meatloaf. If you search, there are even recipes for making "burger" patties out of them. All in all, though, just use it like you would rice.
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Old 04-07-2010, 06:02 AM #24
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I like to grill some veggies. Any suggesstions in that regard?

It's not hard, just make sure to oil the grill before the veggies, and cook them so that they get good color, but cooked to the right consistency. Also, depending on the fibrous nature of the vegetable, a little prep is sometimes necessary - for example, you can grill asparagus as is, but texture-wise it works a little better if you par-steam or boil them first before putting them on the grill. That way, you can more accurately control the doneness of it. Other things, like summer squash, zucchini, eggplant, etc. can be grilled as is.




I would like to hear how you guys go about pizza. Im thinking of getting a bread maker (again, Im a practical guy, not a professional) and part of that would be making dough for all kinds of things. Baking is something I dont delve much into and would like to. Homemade pizza and not just buying a premade crust with store sauce would be exceptional.

Bread makers have their purpose, but for me making (pizza) dough by hand is much more satisfying. Not only will your forearms be sore as hell afterward, but you'll feel much more sense of accomplishment in the final product. One thing I like to do in the summer is Margerita pizza on the grill: Roll the pizza dough out into a circle, and with the grill on high heat, throw it right on. Grill it until the bottom gets nice and golden brown, then pull it off. Turn the heat down, then sauce the browned part of the pizza dough (exposing the uncooked side to the grill), throw some slices of fresh mozzarella, tomato, Parmesan cheese (my own twist), some drizzled olive oil, salt, and tons of black pepper. Throw it back on the grill and close the lid and cook until the cheese is melted. Pull it off, garnish it with some basil chiffonade (finely shredded basil), and enjoy!


I work at a BBQ and would love to get some tips of smoking fish.
Smoked salmon is incredibly easy to do yourself. Liberally coat it with brown sugar/salt/pepper and let it sit overnight. Rinse it all off the next day, and smoke it, over very gentle heat - about the same temperature you'd do bacon at. It can be eaten warm, but it's best refrigerated, and is much easier to slice after it's been chilled as well.



Its the little things that make good food. Any advice you have with stocks would be appreciated. I can make it and it comes out fine but again, the little things I probably dont know would help Im sure.
Use less water than what seems logical. Just enough to cover the bones is just about right. Bring it to a boil, but the key is to reduce it to a gentle simmer and let the flavor come out of the bones, rather than forcing it.
That's all I could cover for now.
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Old 04-07-2010, 12:15 PM #25
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There's a naturally found chemical in it that tends to be on the bitter side. Not sure if you noticed it or not, but the more you rinse it, the better it'll taste.


As far as using it to cook with, yeah, you can absolutely use it in meatloaf. If you search, there are even recipes for making "burger" patties out of them. All in all, though, just use it like you would rice.
I rinsed them but I did notice the hint of that bitterness. Just trying to find uses. I may mix it in with rice because I find it tough to eat by itself (in large quantities).

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Bread makers have their purpose, but for me making (pizza) dough by hand is much more satisfying. Not only will your forearms be sore as hell afterward, but you'll feel much more sense of accomplishment in the final product. One thing I like to do in the summer is Margerita pizza on the grill: Roll the pizza dough out into a circle, and with the grill on high heat, throw it right on. Grill it until the bottom gets nice and golden brown, then pull it off. Turn the heat down, then sauce the browned part of the pizza dough (exposing the uncooked side to the grill), throw some slices of fresh mozzarella, tomato, Parmesan cheese (my own twist), some drizzled olive oil, salt, and tons of black pepper. Throw it back on the grill and close the lid and cook until the cheese is melted. Pull it off, garnish it with some basil chiffonade (finely shredded basil), and enjoy!
Oh theres no doubt its more satisfying but for those days when I have to train, study for a test, and run errands, it becomes a burden to where I couldnt enjoy it since I know how busy Ill be later. And that pizza sounds great. Next time you do it, take some pics! I can only imagine what you culinary students rig up in the back of the kitchens.

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Smoked salmon is incredibly easy to do yourself. Liberally coat it with brown sugar/salt/pepper and let it sit overnight. Rinse it all off the next day, and smoke it, over very gentle heat - about the same temperature you'd do bacon at. It can be eaten warm, but it's best refrigerated, and is much easier to slice after it's been chilled as well.
How gentle are we talking? 125ish? Also, whats a good marinade for baking salmon? Maybe even a couple suggestions. I wanted to do a theme with butter and maybe something with chili powder. Suggestions?

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Use less water than what seems logical. Just enough to cover the bones is just about right. Bring it to a boil, but the key is to reduce it to a gentle simmer and let the flavor come out of the bones, rather than forcing it.
And then you add water appropriately to fit whatever dish youre making? Also, would you say quinoa would be a good addition/replacement for a barley soup kind of thing? Possibly mix both in? I dont just mean possible but a good idea taste wise as well.




Let me end this with saying thanks for all the past responses and future ones.

What are some of your (all of you) favorite meals to cook at home?
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Old 04-07-2010, 12:49 PM #26
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Originally Posted by p8ballstimpy View Post
as a fellow culinary graduate (CSCA-pasadena, ca) and current head chef of a catering company i am glad that you guys started a thread like this. i always thought that the food section need some upstanding posters to answer these types of questions. if your guys don't mind i would like to help you guys out with some of these questions. i also had some other ideas for some stickies, basic culinary terms, methods and recipes (sautee, bbq, grill, roux, stock, etc)

thanks

scott
Of course you can! Post up any ideas you might have and help out other memebers with their questions
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Old 04-07-2010, 01:00 PM #27
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And then you add water appropriately to fit whatever dish youre making? Also, would you say quinoa would be a good addition/replacement for a barley soup kind of thing? Possibly mix both in? I dont just mean possible but a good idea taste wise as well.




Let me end this with saying thanks for all the past responses and future ones.

What are some of your (all of you) favorite meals to cook at home?
Yupp, just add enough water to cover the bones. When we make stock in giant steam kettles we never put more then an inch of water above the bones. If you are still not sure just follow the ratio. You just have to scale it down to your amount.

8# bones
6 qt's water
1# mirepoix

As for the salmon instead of baking it try something new and shallow poach it.
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Old 04-07-2010, 01:01 PM #28
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Of course you can! Post up any ideas you might have and help out other memebers with their questions
The only thing Id say is keep all that stuff in this thread. Keep it condensed. You have no idea what youre inviting onto yourself when you are trying to teach STers stuff. They will come in and ask the same questions weekly and never read what you wrote or take your advice in the first place. Theyll make their mom buy them some stuff at the store, try to make it and then forget about it.

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Yupp, just add enough water to cover the bones. When we make stock in giant steam kettles we never put more then an inch of water above the bones. If you are still not sure just follow the ratio. You just have to scale it down to your amount.

8# bones
6 qt's water
1# mirepoix

As for the salmon instead of baking it try something new and shallow poach it.
I dont have a scale at home sadly. Ill figure something out.
Elaborate on shallow poaching.
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Old 04-07-2010, 01:43 PM #29
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Also, Id like to hear how you make hamburgers if you "stoop" to that. Again, something so basic anyone can do it but making it really well sets that apart.
There is absolutely no "stooping" to be done when making hamburgers. My girlfriend's dad graduated from the CIA (culinary institute of America) and specializes in American food so to speak. He makes ****ing amazing sliders and burgers.

That being said, I am no expert, but I like to make the burgers by hand. Just throw in whatever spiced you like, mash/mix it up into the meat, then form them into patties. so many possibilities.

A personal favorite is what I call the meatball burger:
-ground beef (idk what grade)
-oregano
-basil
-italian breading
-tomato sauce
-mozzarella cheese
-a bun

Mix the oregano, basil, and breading in with the meat. Form patties and grill. While its cooking, heat up the sauce a bit. top the burgers with cheese then sauce when finished on the grill. pop into the oven for a bit to melt the cheese. Place on bun and enjoy.

Its a little inpromptu, but you can mix it up with different cheese, sauces, or even other spices.

**edit**- isnt shallow poaching when you just poach (or boil) the meat in either water or some kind of broth?
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Old 04-07-2010, 05:23 PM #30
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Shallow poaching is when the product is only partially submerged in some sort of liquid. So it is differnet them submerged poaching. Shallow poaching is offen associated with fish.
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Old 04-07-2010, 06:35 PM #31
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Shallow poaching is when the product is only partially submerged in some sort of liquid. So it is differnet them submerged poaching. Shallow poaching is offen associated with fish.
One of my favorite ways to shallow poach is to make a simple court boullion. I poached some scallops in some today for a canape I made. The recipe is quite simple but the white wine compliments salmon well without overpowering the flavor. Take 2 medium white onions, 2 or 3 nice celery ribs(make sure to rinse them off well) and 2 or 3 medium carrots and medium dice all of them.( size isnt too important this isn't for presentation just flavor.) Put all of these in a stockpot and add 5-6 cups of cold water, 2 cups of a nice dry white wine of your choice, Toss in a bay leaf, 4-5 sprigs of fresh parsley and 2-3 sprigs of fresh thyme.(Dry herbs are acceptable, but always use fresh if you can.) Add some salt to your taste and bring this to a boil. Once it comes to a boil reduce your heat to med-low and simmer for around 30 minutes. After simmering strain the solids and your poaching liquids ready. Place the liquid back in your saucepan, add in your salmon filets and bring it to a simmer over medium heat. Simmer your fish for around 25 minutes or until a thermometer inserted in the thickest portion reads a minimum of 140 degrees F, or until the flesh of the fish is opaque and slightly flaky. Your fish can be served straight from the boullion or even served as a cold dish if you choose. A nice sauce to compliment the flavor of the fish without being too overpowering is a basil aioli. The ingredients are as follows.
* 3/4 cup mayonnaise
* 1/3 cup finely chopped fresh basil
* 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
* 1 1/2 teaspoons minced garlic

All you have to do is whisk the ingredients together in a bowl and add salt to taste. While this recipe requires a bit of tedious prep work it is well worth it and will help you develop your knife skills while you're at it! Im willing to offer any other input as well, Great thread!
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Old 04-07-2010, 06:43 PM #32
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sounds really good

Glad you mentioned knife skills, I think it i very important for people to practice knife skills even if they dont go to a culinary school.
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Old 04-07-2010, 08:31 PM #33
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I gotta be honest, I'm loving this thread. I'm def going to try that recipe next week. And yes, getting a nice knife changed my life. Introduce yourself new guy! I'd like to get this threads OGs on a first name basis.
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Old 04-08-2010, 01:13 AM #34
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A nice sauce to compliment the flavor of the fish without being too overpowering is a basil aioli. The ingredients are as follows.
* 3/4 cup mayonnaise
* 1/3 cup finely chopped fresh basil
* 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
* 1 1/2 teaspoons minced garlic
Not to nitpick, but technically that's not really aioli. Aioli is strictly made with olive oil/garlic/egg yolks; mayonnaise is made with vegetable oil/egg yolks. The oil makes a huge difference in taste, and as such, merely adding stuff to mayonnaise does not make it aioli (I'm really OCD about things like cooking terms and procedures, sorry).
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Old 04-08-2010, 01:19 AM #35
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Old 04-08-2010, 09:42 PM #36
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Hey yall, Im having a ***** of a time finding a cast iron dutch oven. Most of the ones I find are that "pre seasoned" stuff. Why is it so hard to find iron cookware thats basic?
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Old 04-09-2010, 04:58 AM #37
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Hey yall, Im having a ***** of a time finding a cast iron dutch oven. Most of the ones I find are that "pre seasoned" stuff. Why is it so hard to find iron cookware thats basic?
The majority of cast iron dutch oven's are enameled these days... Le Creuset set the standard with their $200 enameled dutch ovens, and companies have been following the trend ever since.

Your best bet is a Goodwill or Salvation Army, but things like that are becoming harder and harder to find...
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Old 04-09-2010, 11:56 AM #38
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Old 04-09-2010, 07:15 PM #39
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Grandparents are a good option too. Thats where I got mine lol.
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Old 04-09-2010, 09:30 PM #40
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I am making a cream of asparagas soup this weekend. Would anyone like to have a video made of how to make the 3 different types of rouxs, a veloute, and the soup? I can make it like a how to type of video.As long as my camera will work lol.
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Old 04-10-2010, 06:05 AM #41
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Old 04-10-2010, 07:34 AM #42
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I was just going to do the basic white, blonde, and brown. I dont feel the need to get into black roux and what not,lol.
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