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Old 12-03-2014, 01:34 PM #1
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A+ Cert

Who is working on their A+ cert and who currently has one? Why are you working for one if you're studying for it and, what is your current job if you have an A+ cert and work in the IT field. I'm currently working on mine and have been working as a tech for a small school fixing mostly whatever broke hardware the campuses send me.
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Old 12-03-2014, 06:54 PM #2
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Have it, had to get it for a promotion. Desktop Support, level 2.

A+ is meaningless, it's just something HR departments see and think, "oh, this is cert that looks like it's required for the job". You learn more from hands on, A+ just gives the basics, if you can even call it that.
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Old 12-03-2014, 07:25 PM #3
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Deception is right. The A+ is absolutely meaningless unless you have never worked in IT at all. If that's the case it "may" help you land an entry level job.

However, your post states you already work as a tech doing hardware repair so I would save your money unless your company is paying for it.

Net+/Sec+ would be better options for lower level certs that will help you become more gainfully employed. Especially since the DoD requires all IT folks to have the Sec+ at a minimum.
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Old 12-03-2014, 07:44 PM #4
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If you're going to go to the effort of getting certified in something, it should be something specialized, not a bonehead "HR cert" like an A+. I don't think it is worth the effort unless it is required of you in order to get a job.

Even if you get something super razzle dazzle like a ccie, it's no substitute for experience. Don't be that guy with a million certs but no sense for how IT works in reality.
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Old 12-04-2014, 08:39 AM #5
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Originally Posted by Decption-Clay View Post
Have it, had to get it for a promotion. Desktop Support, level 2.

A+ is meaningless, it's just something HR departments see and think, "oh, this is cert that looks like it's required for the job". You learn more from hands on, A+ just gives the basics, if you can even call it that.
It's been teaching a lot of useless info that I'm sure I'll forget shortly after I pass the tests. I've been working for a year now and the knowledge I've learned hasn't been helpful for anything I've worked on, I mainly do hardware repairs and some data backup and restoration for imaging machines for software issues that can't be fixed within a reasonable time table. I see you're in Conroe do you work for Conroe ISD?

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Originally Posted by ixipaulixi View Post
Deception is right. The A+ is absolutely meaningless unless you have never worked in IT at all. If that's the case it "may" help you land an entry level job.

However, your post states you already work as a tech doing hardware repair so I would save your money unless your company is paying for it.

Net+/Sec+ would be better options for lower level certs that will help you become more gainfully employed. Especially since the DoD requires all IT folks to have the Sec+ at a minimum.
The school is paying for it so I'm not complaining about that however it's painfully long and dull, I am working towards my Net+ I managed to talk the tech director to influencing the business manager into paying for mine and the other technician's certs. I've been noticing a lot of places locally are willing to swap experience in place of certs so it's nice knowing I have other options if I choose to leave the school.

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Originally Posted by Oedipus View Post
If you're going to go to the effort of getting certified in something, it should be something specialized, not a bonehead "HR cert" like an A+. I don't think it is worth the effort unless it is required of you in order to get a job.

Even if you get something super razzle dazzle like a ccie, it's no substitute for experience. Don't be that guy with a million certs but no sense for how IT works in reality.
I'm getting it mainly because I'm fairly young and a lot of places locally are willing to swap experience for certs however, they wish to generally have a few years (3+) in place of certs or they won't bother with you. I know a kind of person like that our old network manager (whom retired thank gods) didn't know anything about repairing the physical cable plants we had that were literally degrading and looked horrible.

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Old 12-18-2014, 11:23 AM #6
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I got an A+ a couple of years ago and it helped me get into the IT field. 90% of entry level positions require one. Even some help desks. That said, once you've got the job experience you don't need to worry about renewing it after 3 years. I got my first part-time tech job with my A+. I've changed jobs 3-4 times in the last couple of years and now I'm doing network support for Lockheed Martin with a couple Microsoft certs and a Cisco.

Get CompTIA certs to get your foot in the door. They're pretty easy and universal. From your first job, study more developed certs.
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Old 12-24-2014, 10:11 AM #7
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I got an A+ a couple of years ago and it helped me get into the IT field. 90% of entry level positions require one. Even some help desks. That said, once you've got the job experience you don't need to worry about renewing it after 3 years. I got my first part-time tech job with my A+. I've changed jobs 3-4 times in the last couple of years and now I'm doing network support for Lockheed Martin with a couple Microsoft certs and a Cisco.

Get CompTIA certs to get your foot in the door. They're pretty easy and universal. From your first job, study more developed certs.
How do you like working for Lockheed?
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:23 PM #8
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Agreed that A+ helps you get your foot in the door, if you already have a job get the Network +. If you are a Windows person MCP and if you are a Linux person LPI. Security + later on.
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Old 02-03-2015, 08:11 PM #9
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Originally Posted by Decption-Clay View Post
Have it, had to get it for a promotion. Desktop Support, level 2.

A+ is meaningless, it's just something HR departments see and think, "oh, this is cert that looks like it's required for the job". You learn more from hands on, A+ just gives the basics, if you can even call it that.
Couldn't have said it better.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:19 AM #10
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I have one myself and it's not worth the $140 I paid a 4 years ago I think. I mean to maybe impress your HR you may want to get a NET +, Security + or Server +. If you would like to leave your job for a better one get a Cisco CCNA or CCNA Security/Voice.
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Old 02-04-2015, 04:02 PM #11
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A+ is really only going to let something like Best Buy look at you. It's not a powerful cert now a days, and any amount of real life experience is going to trump it.

Honestly Networking and Virtualization are the big drives for IT now a days. Compressing their physical architecture, and having knowledgeable support and engineers inside their network.

If you look at, as mentioned above, CCNA and things like VMWARE VCP5-DCV type certs that'll help as they're huge with companies. Especially networking with Voice support as VOIP based call managers power every company now a days.

Virtualization let's companies rebuild their architecture as stuff becomes REALLY out dated with ZERO downtime, saves money on power/hardware, and allows them to have High Availability. It's huge with companies.

I've been in IT for about 16yrs now (whoa, I'm getting old) and I've never once had my A+. My experience has always trumped it.

The three companies like to see:
ITIL -- It's not an IT technical certification, but for any higher level IT position it's big for them because ITIL Framework is the driving force of most IT organizations either solely, or in a hybrid.

CCNA or higher: They love networking guys. Networks are always in flux for organizations so CCNA will get you a second glance when you combine it with real world. It's good to have if you're trying to get into those Junior positions as you'll have a leg up.

Virtualization (VCP5-DCV is Vmware, but it still powers most IT organizations virtual infrastructure... I have only met a few that use anything else like Hyper-V). Especially with VMWARE releasing a free version of ESXi that lets really small organizations that don't need the power of things like vCenter start a virtualized infrastructure. Virtualization + CLOUD is the future of where everyone is going. Data centers are being compressed by using vBlocks or at a minimum Hypervisors cutting their physical footprint to 10% of what it used to be. Cloud combined in there too.
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Old 02-04-2015, 06:42 PM #12
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Some of my coworkers went to VeeamON last year; the CEO of Veeam polled the audience and only TWO hands when up when asked who uses hyper v.

I'm comfortable with both, but my current job is 99% vmware. I know people don't like the idea of a Microsoft hypervisor, but it has always done a good job for me. I run VMware for my main lab setup at home but my desktop and laptop both use client hyper v.
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Old 02-04-2015, 08:34 PM #13
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Hyper-V isn't bad at all, but I've had nothing but positive overall with VMWARE.

Minus the fact the E1000E vNIC hardware hates Windows 2012 R2 and causes ARP issues. Had to dump it, but I like VMXNET3 and it runs like a champ.
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Old 02-04-2015, 08:50 PM #14
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Vmxnet3 or bust
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:07 PM #15
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There is this old black dude at my school who is somehow convinced that Hyper-V is taking over the market and he wants everyone to learn on that instead of vmware.

Pretty much everyone laughs at him behind his back. He's a miserable teacher in anything but security. He knows his **** on that.

We worked with IIS for a few weeks building sites and ****ing with everything you can do with it and he pretty much gave us zero help. We're pretty sure he legit knew nothing about IIS. All I learned from it was that Apache is superior and doesn't make me want to fall head first onto a garden rake.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:43 PM #16
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Vmxnet3 or bust
Agreed. Never really cared, honestly, as very few of our items use enough bandwidth that we pushed the throughput anything crazy (most are high system usage due to SQL, etc).

Once I started having these ARP issues with this setup I started to look into it, and found an obscure bug that ESXi + E1000E + Windows Server 2012 R2 = ARP issues w/ IP's on the same iP range. They'll drop connections sporadically, but only affects the local IP range. Outside ranges are fine.

VMXNET3 has treated me well, and and right now I'm primarily using these to put ESX into remote locations to allow expandability on site without being there everytime (image pushes, etc). So never going to push the 10gb networks "sometimes an issue" people have reported.

ESXi + ILO = me never having to travel to a site as long as they have power + network connectivity. Well, maybe for hardware warranty replacements since every single spot is redundant (RAID 10 to be safe, and all the usual dual components). I rarely would anyhow since I'm a Systems Engineer, but sometimes do just to get things done and put on the happy facetime.
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Old 03-13-2015, 01:04 PM #17
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This is just my personal opinion, I recommend you learn Cisco. Right now I am in CCNA 4, taking my CCENT and CCNA (R&S) exams this summer. Although Cisco does have a lot of proprietary protocols, you still learn various protocols that run across multiple vendors. Which is important to your education because not every single company has a Cisco router/switch. Plus, if you're CCENT/CCNA certified, a lot of companies LOVE it.

If you feel different, please explain why. I have no real world experience, educate me.
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Old 03-14-2015, 06:27 PM #18
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CCNA / CCENT will always get you a second look for sure.
Also put some time into Voice. VOIP drives businesses now. They're starting to really love someone who can handle the Call Manager and Telephony infrastructure on top of the Network side.
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Old 03-15-2015, 10:06 AM #19
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We worked with IIS for a few weeks building sites and ****ing with everything you can do with it and he pretty much gave us zero help. We're pretty sure he legit knew nothing about IIS. All I learned from it was that Apache is superior and doesn't make me want to fall head first onto a garden rake.
seems about right

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Some of my coworkers went to VeeamON last year; the CEO of Veeam polled the audience and only TWO hands when up when asked who uses hyper v.

I'm comfortable with both, but my current job is 99% vmware. I know people don't like the idea of a Microsoft hypervisor, but it has always done a good job for me. I run VMware for my main lab setup at home but my desktop and laptop both use client hyper v.
At home I roll hypver v, work we're a vmware shop. I couldn't imagine what a nightmare it would be if we switched to Hyper V to run our stuff... yeah, no thanks.
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Old 03-15-2015, 08:33 PM #20
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I'm the SysEng Manager for a 2+billion Healthcare company, so... I hire and lead a team of System Admins, Engineers, and Sr. Engineers. We run the datacenters and everything that lives in them. I also manage the desktop engineering team who works on GPO/Images/Application Deployment etc.

Back when I was on this board a lot, I was in most of your shoes doing field tech work and wondering what kinds of certifications will make me relevant to employers. In fact, when I was a mod here, I posted in the mod board and said 'gee would be nice to have a computers forum' and we make one, and later named it Technology afterwards as a catch all. Glad to see it's still kicking.

This is my list of certs:

MCSA: Server 2012.
MCSA: Server 2008.
MCSE: Private Cloud.
VMware VCP 5.x.
MCITP: Enterprise Administrator.
MCITP: Server Administrator.
MCITP: W7 Enterprise Desktop Administrator.
MCITP: Virtualization Administrator.
MCTS: Server 2008 Applications Infrastructure, Configuration.
MCTS: Server 2008R2 Desktop Virtualization.
MCTS: Server 2008R2 Server Virtualization.
MCTS: Server 2008 Active Directory Configuration.
MCTS: Server 2008 Network Infrastructure Configuration.
CompTIA: Security+ |ce
Symantec Back-up Exec Administrator, Windows.


Hyper-V is actually a really good Hypervisor. The primary roadblock is Vmware's operational lock-in, and the fact that most engineers go with what they know. Switching platforms would introduce risk to production, and paying 400K or whatever a year to keep VMware maintained, licensed, and humming along is worth it to most (all?) mid/large organizations. I do run some Test/dev in Hyper-V though and it works fine. Until Microsoft starts giving big Enterprise Agreement incentives or rebates to shops switching from VMware to Hyper-V, you wont see Hyper-V gain significant market share. Which is a shame for shops running SCCM/SCOM because VMM integration is great.

If you come at me with an A+ I'm not going to see your resume because my HR department filters out anyone who doesn't have an MCSA, MCSE, or MCITP. Or a RHEL, or IBM AIX Certs. CCNA / CCE / CCIE / I don't see either because Networking is a different group, and while closely related, a CC* whatever isn't going to help you on my team. That's one thing I see sometimes, people muddying the waters with cross-functional certifications. Pick a side... specialize, and specialize again. For example... System Engineering, Windows, Storage. Or System Engineering, Linux, Virtualization. My path above indicates I picked System Engineering, Windows, Virtualization.

I like to hire from within, so if you're a field tech or helpdesk or workstation guy, ask to sit with Syseng (or networks or voice guys) on your time off and show a little initiative to see the ticket queue from the 3rd tier escalation point of view. With so many folks not showing that initiative, you'll get a lot of brownie points and extra consideration when that SysAdmin I job opens up. Especially if you have a MCSA. If anyone has any specific questions, shoot.
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Old 03-20-2015, 06:19 PM #21
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I am now A+ certified, I should now be getting a $65000 salary according to my A+ textbook.



Kov, my work is paying for classes, books, and test vouchers for CompTIA A+, Security +, and Network +. I'm not paying anything for it so I might as well get those. I should have those certs at the end of May. After that, what cert would you suggest next? I have an interview Monday, assuming it goes well, I am probably going to work in an IT department in a large warehouse for some large internet retailer. They also have the remote IT department at this warehouse for all buildings in Phoenix.
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