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Old 03-29-2015, 07:08 PM #1
FreakinRican3691
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
2012 Spyder Fenix

OK guys so I know you've problem gotten this question a million times but there are just too many threads to read to find my answer lol.

I'm new to the paintball scene and bought a 2012 Spyder Fenix due to the fact that it's suppose to be a pretty good entry level marker. I tried using it this weekend and for some reason trying to chrono the numbers were just all over the place. I was wondering maybe you guys could give me some insight on the situation.
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Old 03-29-2015, 10:53 PM #2
zcason
 
 
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Are you using co2? co2 tends to be unpredictable at times so try HPA if you can. If that doesn't work try taking it to your local airsmith. I had a Fenix for a while and had a couple issues with it until I upgraded to an Etek 4, my sister loves the Fenix though and has never had an issue with it since I gave it to her.
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Old 03-30-2015, 06:06 AM #3
FreakinRican3691
 
 
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Sooo are you trying to tell me the Fenix Is a girl' gun? Lol jk But yeah I'm running CO2 for now. I heard HPA is better, and I've heard that it can also be the regulator.
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Old 03-30-2015, 06:43 AM #4
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CO2 is a liquid that expands when it gets released so it causes a lot of inconsistencies in terms of velocity. If you make the switch to HPA you will notice much better consistency. Did you buy the Spyder new? Markers have a break in period in which your consistency could be all over the place. Shoot like 4-5 cases through it and then your consistency could increase.
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Old 03-30-2015, 07:58 AM #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turpid Porpoise View Post
Markers have a break in period in which your consistency could be all over the place.
^^^^ Very true, give the marker some time to break in and you will notice the marker slowly becoming more consistent.

Factors that will make your marker inconsistent:
-Air source (see other posts for CO2 issues)
-Regulator(s) on marker (regulators have a break in period)
-Markers firing system (needs to be broken in and/or lubricated)
-Paintball quality (inconsistent paintball size/shape normally found on cheaper paint)
-Barrel quality (normally goes hand in hand with paintball quality, even if you get a better barrel bad paint = bad shots)
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Old 03-30-2015, 08:07 AM #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreakinRican3691 View Post
I'm running CO2 for now. I heard HPA is better, and I've heard that it can also be the regulator.
HPA is better for all weather conditions and is better on the system itself. As for the tank being the regulator, I myself wouldn't do it. Just leave the HPA tanks output pressure at 850psi unless you acquire a marker that has instructions in the owners manual stating otherwise. Your spyder will be fine with a standard output HPA tank (850psi).
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Old 03-30-2015, 09:35 AM #7
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OK guys so I'm guessing bottom line is that since the marker was fresh out of the box that's what was giving me the issue and since I was using Co2 the weather also played a factor. So pretty much the remedy would be just dry fire a few times to break it in and then I should be good ?
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Old 03-30-2015, 10:32 AM #8
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Break in periods can range from 200 to 2,000+ shots. Just set the average shot velocity below the field limit and start playing some paintball. Use good paint and the velocities should come together some.

So as an example, if your fields limit is 280fps, and your velocity range is 240 to 290 with the majority of the shots in the middle, hit the field.

Get a hold of an HPA tank and some good paint at a local field to see if it is the CO2 causing the spikes or not.



On the other hand, I am wondering if one can balance out the valve for consistency like one normally does for autocockers.

This is just an idea try the following at the risk of your own equipment, time and paint. This REQUIRES good paint, doing so with anything less will not yield good results. You can use CO2 but I don't think you will get as accurate of a reading as you would with HPA. Read your manual for precise instructions on adjustments.

Have access to a chronograph and the spyder with no paint but aired up. Turn the regulator all the way down (manual states 300psi output or 1 and 1/2 turns from the bottom) and unscrew the velocity adjuster on the back of the marker all the way out before it falls out (if it does indeed fall out, never handled this model).

Shoot the spyder, if it does not fully cycle increase the regulator pressure some until it cycles reliably. Then once it does so, add paint and start shooting 3 -5 shots at a time and keeping track of how big of a fluctuation it is and how high the velocity is. Keep increasing the pressure some until the 3-5 shot velocities start to drop down or spike more than usual then back it off a little. Keep in mind the first 2-3 shots after each adjustment are needed to reset the regulator to the new pressure. The last couple shots will be more of a true reading, shoot a couple more if you want.

Hopefully you should get around the 250-260fps range with less than +/-10fps. If it is less but smooth, don't worry just use the velocity adjustment to fix that. If it is higher and just as smooth as the 250 range turn it down some, you should be fine.

Now start adjusting the velocity with the velocity adjuster until the desired fps is achieved. This should give the valve just the right amount of pressure to shoot without the pressure working against the valve too much.

I have never tried doing this with the newer spyders, but in theory it should work.
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Old 03-30-2015, 11:11 AM #9
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OK so just for clarification it's not my regulator?
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Old 03-30-2015, 11:25 AM #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreakinRican3691 View Post
OK so just for clarification it's not my regulator?
It is a possibility that your regulator may have too high of an output or your regulator needs to be broken in.

The velocity inconsistency can be caused by a multitude of reasons, but pinpointing it will be difficult without the spyder in hand.
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Old 03-30-2015, 03:08 PM #11
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OK so bottom line is that taking my gun fresh out of the box to a field was a bad idea and I should break it in first before taking it out again
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Old 03-30-2015, 04:29 PM #12
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Sigh, looks like I gave too much information, lets start over.
You most likely need to break in the marker. The best way to do this is to use it, the best way to use it is by playing paintball with it. Bring it to the field and play paintball.

Don't worry about the velocity variances, it is normal for anyone using a new CO2 powered blowback style marker. The problem should balance itself out after use. If you put 2000+ rounds through it and it is still doing the same thing, then you can try messing with the input pressure like I said a couple posts ago. Until that time comes don't worry about it, use good paint and have fun.
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Old 03-30-2015, 05:14 PM #13
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OK Kool thanks for the advice, I really appreciate it. Like I said I'm new to all of this so when my marker didn't work the way I thought it would it threw me off.
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