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Old 12-11-2006, 07:25 PM #1
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Christian an obliged religion

As we all know the "tradition" that in chrisitianity children are usually "forced" into the religion at baptism by their parents. Personally i have been very blessed that my parents didnt follow this tradition and i am still an atheust that goes to a catholic school and all but for alot of my fellow catholic friends this has been a big problem. How do you feel about this?
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Old 12-11-2006, 07:29 PM #2
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The indoctrination of children is a sad thing. That said, if a child is exposed to other things in life, they still have the option of renouncing their faith.
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Old 12-11-2006, 07:32 PM #3
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I grew up with my parents taking me to a baptist church. No one was forced into baptism, each kid had to make the decision themselves to be baptized once they understood the decision they were making. Most people that grew up in the church chose to be baptized around ten years of age.
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Old 12-11-2006, 07:32 PM #4
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The indoctrination of children is a sad thing. That said, if a child is exposed to other things in life, they still have the option of renouncing their faith.
for this is what i give thanks to my parents decision for

neways as the question said whats it like for those lessfortunate than me?
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Old 12-11-2006, 08:03 PM #5
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so you guys out there have nothing against being forced into a religion
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Old 12-11-2006, 08:31 PM #6
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so you guys out there have nothing against being forced into a religion
If it's what you're told from an early age, then you're going to believe it. It's not forced, but it's impressed into a child's mind that it's what happens.

Eventually they will be old enough to make their own decisions, and it's up to them what they want to do with their religion.
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Old 12-11-2006, 08:56 PM #7
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ahh i see
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Old 12-11-2006, 09:24 PM #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drigerV88 View Post
As we all know the "tradition" that in chrisitianity children are usually "forced" into the religion at baptism by their parents. Personally i have been very blessed that my parents didnt follow this tradition and i am still an atheust that goes to a catholic school and all but for alot of my fellow catholic friends this has been a big problem. How do you feel about this?
we "all" know this? baptism as a child is not a universal Christian sacrement. in fact many Christians find infant baptism to be offensive, if not heretical.

as for a Parent raising their child, that is up to them, and in my opinion, a real Christian parent will choose to raise their child as Christian untill they reach an age where they are no longer living in that house and decide for themselves. Until then, I do believe that it is the parents prerogative. In fact, I believe it to be the Christian duty of a parent to bring up their child in their like belief. (I would expect no less from a parent of any other religion, if they truly believe in what they believe, whether I agree with it or not).
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Old 12-11-2006, 10:05 PM #9
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I grew up with my parents taking me to a baptist church. No one was forced into baptism, each kid had to make the decision themselves to be baptized once they understood the decision they were making. Most people that grew up in the church chose to be baptized around ten years of age.
Right, because at 10 they knew what they were doing.
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Old 12-11-2006, 10:07 PM #10
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Honestly, I would not go to church if my parents didn't force me. It seems like a waste of time, theres much better things you can do to help the world than sit in a church for 2 hours.
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:02 PM #11
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Right, because at 10 they knew what they were doing.
Nope, most of them probably do not understand everything about their choice, but the kids were the ones asking to be baptized, I don't think they were going to deny them with "sorry, you are too young to be accepted by the church".
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:12 PM #12
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Nope, most of them probably do not understand everything about their choice, but the kids were the ones asking to be baptized, I don't think they were going to deny them with "sorry, you are too young to be accepted by the church".
How about they allow them to mature and then make the decision instead of beating it into their minds as such a young age.
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:13 PM #13
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How about they allow them to mature and then make the decision instead of beating it into their minds as such a young age.


How about I have no control on how parents raise their kids?
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:15 PM #14
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How about I have no control on how parents raise their kids?
Do you have any say as a human? Bring it up in your church, which Baptists are known as the "crazy" christians.
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:18 PM #15
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Do you have any say as a human? Bring it up in your church, which Baptists are known as the "crazy" christians.
I don't go any more. I doubt they would raise their children different because I told them to stop teaching them to believe in Christianity.
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:38 PM #16
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I don't think I was even baptized.
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Old 12-12-2006, 10:27 AM #17
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Its really not all that big of a deal. No one complains if you raise your kid up in an Italian, Irish, or Hispanic heritage. No one would really care if you raise your kid up to speak 2 languages. The same with religion.

Even though they are raised up in a church, they have all the power they want to refuse it. Usually in the late teens and early 20's is when it happens. Adolosence stage 3 and 4. Figuring out on their own if they believe what they've been told and then turning it into what they actually believe.
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Old 12-12-2006, 12:58 PM #18
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As we all know the "tradition" that in chrisitianity children are usually "forced" into the religion at baptism by their parents.
Really? Do you even remember anything that happened before you were six months old?
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Old 12-12-2006, 01:03 PM #19
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Additionally, whose job is it to raise the children?
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Old 12-12-2006, 02:07 PM #20
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WOW, you make soooo many threads
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Old 12-12-2006, 02:34 PM #21
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As we all know the "tradition" that in chrisitianity children are usually "forced" into the religion at baptism by their parents. Personally i have been very blessed that my parents didnt follow this tradition and i am still an atheust that goes to a catholic school and all but for alot of my fellow catholic friends this has been a big problem. How do you feel about this?
A very nice question. The more I think about it, the deeper it becomes.

On one hand, is it really wrong for parents of a faith to wish their children to also follow their faith? Especially when their faith holds that if they don't, the children will be punished in the afterlife?

On the other hand, is it moral for parents to teach their children something unscientific, and by modern standards bigoted (with respect to other religions as well as alternative sexual preferences)? Is it moral for the family to cast some sort of social punishment on a child if they renounce the religion, become homosexual, marry into another faith, etc?

I don't know. I guess I was "indoctrinated" Jewish. I went to a Jewish preschool, then after that always spent a couple hours at least one day a week in religious school. When I was youngest it was only Sunday, then it ramped up to two days a week, then when I was 11, 12, 13 (the years leading up to a Bar Mitzvah) it was three days a week. I had a Bar Mitzvah.

And yet I've decided I don't believe in god, and my family doesn't outcast me in any way. In fact, I've pretty much got my dad admitting that he doesn't believe in god either.

I dont know, I think my situation (and the ease of which I can renounce god without any social stigma) might have to with the high level of secularity in my family and in my community, and also in the different way that Judaism looks upon people like myself compared to Christianity.
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