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Old 06-04-2006, 11:34 PM #1
{TWC} GUNHEAD
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How much Co2 can you put in a 68cu tank ?

Ok this is the deal....I bought a old shoebox shocker that has an old maxflo system on it ...It came with a 68/3000 tank with a Co2 on/off,,,

How many ounces of Co2 can you fit in this tank ?
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Old 06-05-2006, 02:54 AM #2
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a lot, the nice part about those is they have a huge capacity, and since the pressure is rated on the bottle for more than twice the max worknig pressure, you can pretty much fill almost 3lbs into it.
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Old 06-05-2006, 10:55 AM #3
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i'm using a 48/3000 tank for a project on my car (backup hidden nitrous setup), and I'm wondering what is the amount (weight) of co2 (same weight as nytrous+) a bottle could hold? It will be a 1200psi operating pressure.

I'm not much of a physics buff, so volumetric effiency is pretty much german to me... Would I just divide the 3000 psi fill amount by 2.5?
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Old 06-05-2006, 12:27 PM #4
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No.

A 68ci tank can hold up to 24oz of liquid co2.

However, I would not put more then 20oz in there to allow for some room of safety.

The rule of thumb is for HPA tanks is that for every 45ci, you can fit 1lb of liquid co2.

It was common to put co2 in hpa/nitro tanks in the late 90s, especially if you owned a shocker. Pretty rare these days though. Most HPA tanks are rated to handle co2. The bigger problem is the regs are NOT. It is almost gaureenteed that you will blow your downstream burst disc.

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Old 06-05-2006, 12:31 PM #5
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Interesting. What storage pressure does it maintain with the 1lb per 45ci capacity?

I have found a source for syphon valves with no reg, but i'd need the bottle pressure to be right around 1000 (can be heated/cooled to tweak).. but 3000psi is out of the question.
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Old 06-05-2006, 12:33 PM #6
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another idea.. i could use an unregulated CO2 valve as well.. that would be the cheapest option.. BUT, it would still require the operating pressure of around 1000.


Sorry to hijack your thread gunhead, but they're both about pretty much the same thing.
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Old 06-05-2006, 01:06 PM #7
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First, you are a little confused about Co2.
Co2 is a "self regulating gas", meaning that the pressure at 70degrees will be 800psi if the tank is full OR NEARLY EMPTY.

So, weather a tank is 3000psi or 5000psi MAKES NO DIFFERENCE.
Co2 is stored by volume, since the pressure is fixed.

So, take your tank size, divide by "45", then multiply by "16", and thats how much liquid Co2 it can safetly hold.

Second, do you mean anti-siphon? A Siphon tube will FORCE liquid out, while the anti-siphon will help prevent i? You don't want to mix those up.

Regarding Co2 pin/valves, note: The thread size is different. Not the 5/8" you usually see with co2 tanks.

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Old 06-05-2006, 09:14 PM #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hp_lovecraft
First, you are a little confused about Co2.
Co2 is a "self regulating gas", meaning that the pressure at 70degrees will be 800psi if the tank is full OR NEARLY EMPTY.

So, weather a tank is 3000psi or 5000psi MAKES NO DIFFERENCE.
Co2 is stored by volume, since the pressure is fixed.

So, take your tank size, divide by "45", then multiply by "16", and thats how much liquid Co2 it can safetly hold.

Second, do you mean anti-siphon? A Siphon tube will FORCE liquid out, while the anti-siphon will help prevent i? You don't want to mix those up.

Regarding Co2 pin/valves, note: The thread size is different. Not the 5/8" you usually see with co2 tanks.

nick

Nick,


I did mean siphon. I'm going to use this with Nitrous, so it is essential that it is a liquid. For some reason earlier today it was not clicking about the temperature/pressure ratio. Man, how could I screw that up?

As far as the valves are concerned.. The threading from the valve to the bottle is different between HPA and CO2? Damnit. Any idea where to get a HPA valve WITHOUT a reg that is <$50?

This is the reference I use for nitrous.. it seems to be pretty close to co2 for its pressures.


Temp Pressure
60* 675*
70* 760
80* 865
95* 1020
97* 1070
109* 1150


Thanks for the info!
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Old 06-06-2006, 01:56 AM #9
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nick, i think you may be wrong about the amount of CO2, not 100% sure, but still, a 20oz tank is smaller than 45ci of space, so if your rule is right, that would mean a 20oz tank should only hold 12oz of co2. also, i know a 68 can hold more than a 24, as that was one of the reasons people went to them to hold CO2 instead of the 24oz bottles, because they held more.
the threads are the same for CO2 to carbon fiber bottles.
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Old 06-06-2006, 07:56 AM #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by p8ntballsteve
nick, i think you may be wrong about the amount of CO2, not 100% sure, but still, a 20oz tank is smaller than 45ci of space, so if your rule is right, that would mean a 20oz tank should only hold 12oz of co2.
The info is right on Catalina Cylinders website.
A "20oz" holds 20oz of co2, and a 45ci tank holds about 16oz.
So, its not hard to extrapolate figures for other size tanks.

45ci tanks are usually much heavier then 20oz co2 tanks, and they also have thicker side walls because of the higher pressure, which I think gives the impression that they are larger, when in fact the INTERNAL volume is slightly smaller.

Quote:
I did mean siphon. I'm going to use this with Nitrous, so it is essential that it is a liquid.
They are so close in properties that it is VERY COMMON in the racer community to use co2 tanks to hold nitrous. Most CO2 tanks are rated for nitrous, however, you are supposed to have the tanks CHEMICALLY TREATED before you can fill them with nitrous.
The reason that there is a danger of explosion from the nitrous reacting to surface elements in the tank.
This applies to both aluminiun, and fiber/carbon tanks, since those are all aluminiun lined anyway.

Anyway, here is the guide to converting a tank to hold nitrous is called "CGA G-4.1"

Nick
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