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Old 12-17-2001, 05:11 AM #1
Nerobro
 
 
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READ THIS FIRST: The FAQ, the README, the Etc......

ABOUT THE MARKERS:

For the most part Spyders are all the same, the differences are:
  • Mech vs. Electro-Mech.
  • Some come with regs, some don't.
  • Some have slightly different feeds from others.
  • Some have an LCD screen.
  • Some have a fatty striker, some have a slim striker.
  • Some have a full body, and some are compact.
  • The EM1 and Primal are pneumatic ram driven markers.

-----------------------------------------------------------------



KINGMAN TECH AND MAINTENANCE - CLICK HERE

KINGMAN TUTORIAL VIDEOS - CLICK HERE

KINGMAN DIAGRAMS AND MANUALS - CLICK HERE

DRAGUN THE ONE MANUAL - CLICK HERE
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Old 12-17-2001, 08:56 PM #2
SuPrBuGmAn
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Troubleshooting just about everything--your problem and fix is more than likely here.

If your gun is burping look here:

BURPING-when a paintball marker cycles without the sear latching the striker/hammer (burping AKA: going full auto, farting, etc...). Burping is
cause by air restrictions, excess friction, blockage, air leakage,
improperly assembled markers, inadequate cocking pressure, inadequate
backpressure, improper lubrication, and worn/broken parts.

Check your power source, make sure you have adequate cocking pressure. If you think you have a power source problem, go fill your tank up and try to
shoot your marker with a full CO2 or HPA tank...

Check all your O-rings. This includes valve o-rings, vertical adapter
o-rings, bolt O-rings, low pressure chamber/valve plug o-ring and the
striker O-ring. (See Pictures 1 & 2) Replace any that are worn or broken,
keep in mind that some O-ring damage is too small to notice with the eye
(although it still may affect the gun as if there was no O-ring there at
all).Check your cup seal. Replace it if its damaged (sometimes cup seal damage is not noticeable to the human eye). (See Picture 1)
Make sure your valve body screw is flush with the receiver. It may cause a
flow restriction if screwed in farther. (See Picture 1)

Make sure you have oiled your gun and make sure to use paintball specific
oil. Other oils may damage the O-ring even dissolve them. Different oils
have different viscosities and temperature tolerances also, its a good idea
to use paintball lube that won't gum up your marker in cold/hot weather. Oil
all O-rings, bolt, striker, and put a few drops in the ASA (then shoot a few
times without a barrel).

Check for any kind of valve damage. Any damage whatsoever can cause
re-cocking and/or leaking problems. The valve is made of a very delicate
metal that scratches easily. If the valve is damaged replace it. To avoid
valve damage, do not remove the valve unless you are replacing it or
upgrading it to another higher flowing turbo valve. (See Picture 1)
Check the valve pin for damage. Make sure the pin is not bent and seats
properly on the cup seal and contacts the striker/hammer pin. (See Picture
1) Check the sear for excess wear. If it is worn, it will not catch the
striker thus cause burping. If damaged, replace it. (See Picture 4 )

Check the striker for excess wear. If it is worn or rounded, it will not
catch the sear thus cause burping. If damaged, replace it. (See Picture 2)
Shoot your gun with paint. Some guns just decide they don't want to re-cock
without paint. The paint gives the gun just a little extra backpressure to
re-cock.

Check for any flow restrictions. Make sure there is nothing blocking the gas lines to your valve. Take out any gunk and the stupid factory filters
which Kingman has thrown into the lines. These will all cause air
restrictions which can cause inadequate re-cocking pressure.
If you are regulating your gun, make sure the regulator is set to allow
adequate pressure for the gun to re-cock. If you think this is the case,
simply turn up your regulator.

Look in the inside bore of the receiver. Where all your internals go. Check
for any deep gashes, scratches or burs that may cause leaking or excess
friction, both which may cause burping. (See Picture 1 & 3)
Check the valve chamber plug, if you have an older standard spyder, make
sure the plug is flush with the receiver (body).
Check your Trigger Frame to be sure it is secured to the receiver. If it is
loose, the sear and striker may not engage causing burping. (See Picture 3 & 4)






If your gun is leaking, look here:

Check your power source. If there is not adequate pressure to seal the
valve, air will escape through the barrel. Make sure you have a full tank.
Check all your O-rings. This includes valve O-rings, vertical adapter
O-rings, bolt O-rings, low pressure chamber/valve plug O-ring and the
striker O-ring. (See Pictures 1 & 2) Replace any that are worn or broken,
keep in mind that some O-ring damage is too small to notice with the eye
(although it still may affect the gun as if there was no O-ring there at
all).

Check your cup seal. Replace it if its damaged (sometimes cup seal damage
is not noticeable to the human eye). (See Picture 1)
Make sure you have oiled your gun and make sure to use paintball specific
oil. Other oils may damage the O-ring even dissolve them. Different oils
have different viscosities and temperature tolerances also, its a good idea
to use paintball lube that won't gum up your marker in cold/hot weather. Oil
all O-rings, bolt, striker, and put a few drops in the ASA (then shoot a few
times without a barrel).

Check for any kind of valve damage. Any damage whatsoever can cause
re-cocking and/or leaking problems. The valve is made of a very delicate
metal that scratches easily. If the valve is damaged replace it. To avoid
valve damage, do not remove the valve unless you are replacing it or
upgrading it to another higher flowing turbo valve. (See Picture 1)
Check the valve pin for damage. Make sure the pin is not bent and seats
properly on the cup seal and contacts the striker/hammer pin. (See Picture
1)

If you are regulating your gun, make sure the regulator is set to allow
adequate pressure for the gun to re-cock and adequate pressure to seal the valve. If you think this is the case, simply turn up your regulator.
Look in the inside bore of the receiver. Where all your internals go. Check
for any deep gashes, scratches or burs that may cause leaking or excess
friction, both which may cause burping. (See Picture1 & 3)

If your gun is breaking paint, use this checklist to determine the cause and
possibly fix. You will first determine where the paint breaks are occuring.


For chopping in the breech:

check bolt for burs
check reciever for burs
check powerfeed plug make sure its aligned properly
check nubin for excess wear
make sure your not using crap paint
use a revy
check your velocities
cold weather makes paint brittle-take that into consideration
modifying the bolt so it cups the paintball better will help
going LP will be gentler on the paint
oil your gun

For chopping in the barrel:

check barrel for burs
check paint/barrel match
make sure your not using crap paint
check your velocities
cold weather makes paint brittle-take that into consideration
going will be gentler on the paint


Low velocities? Here is a bunch of fixes to your problem.


Screw your velocity adjuster in further
Put a stiffer main(striker) spring into your gun
Put a lighter valve spring into your gun
Turn the output pressure of your regulator up
Make sure you are using a good paint/barrel match
Use a barrel with less porting
Use higher flowing internals(vertical adapter, valve, bolt)


High velocities? Here are some fixes.


Unscrew the velocity adjuster some
Put a lighter main(striker) spring into your gun
Put a stiffer valve spring into your gun
Turn the output pressure of your regulator down
Use barrel with more porting


I'll throw the How-Tos at you guys later. If you just can't wait for em, goto the Articles Section of http://spyder-club.org - they can be found there.
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Old 01-14-2002, 04:45 AM #3
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How to tell if you have a fatty versus slim striker.

Take the hammer and bolt out of the gun. Take the bolt and try to put it in the lower hole in the gun. If the bolt can go in, it's a fatty striker. If you can't put the bolt in the lower hole, then it's a slim striker.
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Old 02-27-2002, 01:58 PM #4
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Shooting Hot

Shooting hot is caused by a coupple things in spyders. Most commonly it's due to liquid co2 being in the gun. Lets start at the begning.

You just bought your gun. You take it to the field and you can't get it to shoot under 320fps. (a typical number BTW) What you can do is clip the spring so the gun has less energy stored in the spring, and shoots a lower velocity..... If you haven't gone tot eh field yet, cock your gun now. leave it cocked untill you get to the field. This will weaken the spring a little, adn get your gun into the right velocity range. My spyders are stored with the hammers cocked untill they shoot the right velocity with the velocity screw halfway in.

OK, so you gun isn't new. And you get really inconsistant velocity... first off the probelm is most likely liquid co2 getting into the gun. So... it's not something to fix on the gun per-se, but more of something to fix with yourself. Here's how to deal with a gun that is running co2.

NEVER point the barrel down. Co2 is stored as a liquid and will seek the lowest point in the system. Most likely the valve chamber if the gun is pointing down. Liquid co2 is very dense, and for the given volume that can squeeze through the valve when it's open... well it can cause 50-100fps velocity spikes.

After you get your co2 tanks filled, they should be allowed to warm up to the ambiant temprature. Do NOT put hot packs on them, and do not keep them in an insulated container. Do not put socks/tank covers over them. They need as much airflow as they can get so they will maintain a temprature as close to the ambiant temprature as possiable.

To creat gas co2 the liquid co2 needs to boil off. And to boil takes energy. The tank will absoarb this energy from the surrounding air. If you insulate the tank you are removing the tanks source of energy.

What it comes down to is that to maintain "normal" velocitys with a co2 powered paintgun, you need to maintain tank temprature, and do the best you can to feed the gun dry (aka no liquid) co2.

Here's how I did it:
20oz antisiphon tank on bottomline.
Pro-Power Expantion chamber.

And that's it. The real secret was to keep the gun vertical and near level at all times so no liquid would get into the gun. The expantion chamber was a good design.... one that had very small fins on the outside to provide a warm place to vaporize liquid co2..... It's the only chamber I've seen work. In other setups with the same preformance I've used the palmers stabilizer with good results.

To sum it up. If you are runnign co2. NEVER carry the gun pointing down. If you are running antisiphon, don't even lay the gun on it's side. Follow those two rules, and you should be golden.
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Old 07-16-2002, 11:18 AM #5
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My gun seems to NOT finish recocking..

If you fire the gun FAST you will on occation have the gun stick, and you'll need to recock the gun. This is NOT the gun not successfully recocking. This problem is paint not feeding. The bolt is stopping on a ball, instead of chopping it mind you. The solution is to buy a faster loader. Or to slow down your mrof.
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Old 10-01-2003, 01:21 AM #6
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Preset Tank Pressure

The spyder is not a gun that runs under 250 psi, so you should not under any circumstances use a 450psi tank.

The only reason to purchase a 450psi tank is if you have a gun with a regulator that's improperly built and cannot take 850psi input pressure.

For regulators to work right, they need head pressure. 450psi is not enough head pressure to properly regulate down for even a good low pressure spyder. (running in the 300-400psi range giving you 50-150psi head pressure)

OH yea, did I mention that the 450psi tank is hard to sell becuase most of the market still wants a 850psi output tank?

Long story short. Buy a high pressure tank.
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Old 03-09-2004, 02:16 PM #7
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How to use springs!

As originally posted by LinkD3ad

Here we go, Springs and Spring Kits:

Main Spring

The harder the main spring (hammer spring, striker spring, whatever you want to call it), there will be slightly more kick, and your valve dwell will increase. This means the valve will be open longer, and more air can go to the ball and to reset the striker. This will increase your FPS. The weaker the main spring, the lower the valve dwell, the lower the kick, but it lowers your FPS. There is also the chance it is weak enough to be weak enough that if a ball is half fed, the bolt will just stop right on the ball. (stock spyder springs can do this once worn down a bit)

Valve Spring

The valve spring, in tandem with the main spring, will allow how long the valve dwell with be. The stronger the valve spring, the lower your valve dwell will be. The weaker your valave spring, your valve dwell will be higher.


There is no specific "setup" that will be consistant with every spyder. Spyders are created with lower tolerances that higher end markers, so your spring combo will be different Spyder to spyder. You might also not want the highest valve dwell, as it can make you actually lose efficiency.

With a regulator (Palmer's Stabilizer, AKA Sidewinder, Worr Verticle Reg, etc., etc.) you can lower the pressure considerably with the correct spring combo. Let's say you want the lowest pressure possible, you would put in the heaviest main spring, and the weakest valve spring, which will raise your valve dwell considerably. You can then lower the pressure quite a bit, because if you kept the pressure the same, your FPS would raise to propbably unsafe levels. If you do not have a regulator, go to a field/store (or if you have a chronograph at home) and chronograph your FPS. Change your springs as needed, untill you have the desired FPS. Also, If you do not have a regulator, sometimes you cannot bring your FPS down low enough for the field regulations. You would put a weaker main spring or a harder valve spring in, each of which would lower your valve dwell, thusly lowering your FPS.

There you go, all you need to know about springs and spring kits on spyders! Have fun!
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Old 08-29-2004, 05:43 PM #8
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Otters Operation Diagram



Quote:
Originally posted by iknow81810



First, you cock your gun by pulling back the cocking knob/handle. You pull it far enough that the bottom of the striker catches on the sear, which is on the top of the trigger frame.

Always cock the gun before you put air on the gun. When you cock it, the breech is opened and a ball rolls down. CO2 starts out in the CO2 tank, obviously, under presures of anywhere from 600-1000 psi, depending on the temperature.

When you screw the tank into your ASA/Bottomline, the pin valve opens up and lets CO2 go through. The CO2 goes through the ASA, through a hose, through a gas-thru grip, through the vertical adapter, then the CO2 sits in the valve chamber and the LPC, or low pressure chamber. It can't go any further since the cup seal is in the way. All of this happens instantaneously (sp?).

Now the marker is ready to fire. Next, you pull the trigger. Since this is an e-marker we are talking about, the next thing that happens is you click the microswitch in. This completes a circuit, and that tells the board to energize the solinoid. The solinoid trips the sear, which lets the hammer and bolt go forward because the mainspring has pressure behind the hammer.

The bolt goes forward and pushes a ball down the barrel, and the breech closes. The hammer goes forward and hits the end of the valve stem. The valve stem goes forward and the cup seal gets moved back. CO2 goes rushing into the valve. Some CO2 is directed up through the bolt which pushes the ball out at whatever your velocity is set at. Usually around 285 feet per second.

The other CO2 is directed out of the back of the valve and that air pushes the hammer back to the sear. CO2 comes back up to the valve chamber and LPC after this all happens through the tank. Now the process is ready to occur again.

* Slightly modified from the original post, I added spaces so that it isn't just one huge paragraph. I also knocked off the intro/wrap in order to focus on the "beef" of it.

-Shawn

Last edited by Devilstar2k2 : 09-05-2004 at 12:29 AM.
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Old 04-05-2005, 09:14 PM #9
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IF YOU HAVE EYES AND STILL CHOP READ THIS




Okay here is how it works.

The ball drops and breaks the beam. This board counts down the set eye delay time and then releases that signal to fire the noid.

Here is the problem with the revvy. It is not a force feed loader so therefore it has no stack pressure. Meaning under high rates of fire the ball breaks the beam and bounces back up since the is not stack pressure to keep it in the breach. During all of this chaos the board fires since it has already counted down it's eye delay. The marker fires and chops the ball that has bounced up.

With the Egg you kinda have the same problem if the eye delay is set too short. The propeller runs at it's fastest speed (under high rates of fire) and it is like pedaling down hill on a 10 speed in 1st gear. This causes a lack of stack pressure and the ball bounces in the breach and chops.

Most people say that the eyes are not working properly. The eyes did there job and sent the signal to the board, it was the loader that failed. You WILL CHOP with any loader out there if your settings are off. What I have found is find out what your max capabilities are for YOUR set-up, then set your board to be slower than that. For instance my max rate of fire (ROF) with my stock HALO B is 21bps. I set my ROF to 18 just incase of battery drain, air pressure drop, or a oversize ball causing a hold-up. Now with my Reloader B I know my max ROF is around 24bps so I set the ROF to 20 or 21 for the same reasons. For normal rec players I would go more conservative on the settings. Like if your max ROF is 22bps then set your board up to where it's max potential is 17bps. The reason I run such a close tolorance is because I use lithium batteries and change them regularly, plus I unplug the pack after the day is over. If you run Duracell, Energizer MAX or a EL Cheapo battery like Maxcell or Panasonic I would change them everytime you play, otherwise you will decrease the safe margine you have established already, causing a chopping issue. This leads to the thread of "I played ball today and was chopping like crazy. I don't know what happened I played 2 weeks ago and everything was fine." So when this happends I hope this post clears that up for some of you guys. Also the batteries in the marker need to be fresh as well. If they are dead you will chop. They run the eyes can't do that without power.

To sum it up. Set your board to your safety margine and keep fresh batteries in your equipment.
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