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Old 11-05-2008, 02:21 PM #1
WarHamster
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Accessing Your Sniper Valve & Tuning Step By Step

Alright guys, I see people asking questions about how to fix problem x on their sniper and when those of us with more experience try to explain what to do they people don't even know how to access their valve or what the various parts are. I'm hoping to correct that with this guide. I'm going to do a step by step of how to access your valve and most of the internals, show what each part is, and give an exploded view of the inside of a sniper. Hopefully we can point newbies in this direction to help them out in the future.

DISASSEMBLING YOUR SNIPER

Step 1: Assembling your tools.
To do all this you need a few things. First of all you need a set of standard (non-metric) Allen aka Hex wrenches. Which sizes you will need will vary from sniper to sniper (different companies use different sizes). Ideally you should pick up a full set of nice ball-ended. You can find these at any hardware store for under $10 and will make working on your sniper infinitely easier by allowing you to work on screws from an angle.
Second you will need a standard autococker valve tool. This is absolutely essential for getting your valve out. It's not even worth the bother of trying to make one. Pick up a decent tool like the one New Designz makes for $10 or $15 and it will last you the rest of your life.
Third you need a CLEAN work space. We'll be working with a few small pieces and it's quite easy to loose them (believe me). You will want a large clean table, workbench, etc. where you can set everything out and not loose it.
Fourth and finally you will need your sniper... DUH!

The Sniper We Will Be Working On

The Tools



Step 2: Removing your trigger frame.
For most snipers, the screws holding your trigger frame will require a standard 1/8 allen wrench. If you have ball headed wrenches this will be much easier for you as you can turn them from and angle to work around the trigger guard. However, you do it though, simply remove the two screws at the front and back of the trigger frame as shown in the pictures. One your frame is free it might still be attached by the bottomline running to the regulator. If this is the case you can either unscrew the bottomline from the frame the same way, unplug the macroline (if your sniper is using macroline), or unscrew the regulator from the rest of the sniper. Which you do is entirely personal preference

The magical 1/8 ball-headed allen wrench

Removing the front screw

Removing the rear screw

The frame free from the rest of the marker


Step 3: Removing your cocking rod.
This step is easy enough. You simply need to unscrew the cocking rod found below the bolt. It may be held in very tight depending on it's make and who installed it, but it WILL unscrew. If the head of the cocking rod starts to unscrew from the rod itself, then tighten the small setscrew in the head of the cocking rod, then keep trying to unscrew the rod as a whole. If you find the rod completely unremovable here's a little trick that might mar the finish but with almost certainly get it out. Take a pair of wire cutters and use the circular guide (BEFORE the cutting blades) to grip the head of the cocking rod better.

Our cocking rod

The cocking rod unscrewed


Step 4: Removing your bolt.
This should be the EASIEST step in the entire disassembly. Simply remove the pullpin from the bolt and the bolt should slid right out of the marker. Pull pins vary widely and some require pushing a button to remove them while some just require a good strong tug.

Removing the pull pin

The bolt & cocking rod removed from the backblock


Step 5: Removing your backblock.
This is another easy step. Just stick your finger into where the bolt just came out and rotate the backblock. It should easily unscrew from the rod holding it onto the marker.

(Alternative Method): As an alternative method. It is possible with some pump kits to simply rotate the backblock 1/2 and pull it away from the body, then slide the backblock, pump rod, & pump handle off as one entire assembly. I am personally not fond of this method as I always feel like I am putting stress on the threads of the pump handle. Many people report preferring this method however. Which you choose to use is entirely up to you. -Thanks to ApoC 101

Our backblock

Removing it

Gone!


Step 6: Removing your pump handle.
Another easy step. The pump handle and pump rod (what the backblock was attached to) should now easily pull off the front of your sniper.

Just pull it right off!


Step 7: Removing your IVG.
Your IVG acts as a back to the spring that drives the hammer in your sniper. Screwing it in further will increase tension on the hammer and make it hit the valve harder & thus make your sniper shoot harder. Removing your IVG will depend on what type it is. If it is a CCM IVG you can use a standard 1/8 allen wrench in the little holes around the outside of the wrench and just unscrew it right out of the body. If it is a standard IVG you can use a 3/16 allen wrench in the hole that the cocking rod came out of, and again just unscrew it right out of the body.

Additional Information: If your sniper is already nicely tuned, then make sure you take note of how many turns it takes you to unscrew the IVG when you are removing it. When you reassemble the sniper, you can simply screw it in that many turns and skip the step of having to adjust the IVG depth. -Thanks to ApoC 101

The IVG hiding in that bottom tube

My 1/8 allen in the outer hole of my CCM IVG

A standard IVG with a 3/16 allen in the center (just for reference)


Step 8: Removing your mainspring.
Your main spring which is held in by the IVG we just removed should now fall right out of the back of your sniper. This spring is one of the primary two ways to adjust the velocity on your sniper. By increasing it's tension via the IVG it makes the hammer hit the valve harder thus allowing more air through.

There it is!

It falls right out of the marker with the IVG gone!
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Old 11-05-2008, 02:21 PM #2
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Step 9: Removing your hammer.
This is one of the first tricky steps in taking apart your sniper. If you look at the bottom of your sniper right now, you will see the hammer has a lug extending down into a slot in the body. This lug is what the trigger frame catches & releases in order to allow the marker to fire. We will have to retract this lug back into the hammer before we can remove it. To do this we have to look at the top of the sniper. There will be a small hole on the top roughly where I am pointing in the picture. Now tilt the body forward and ensure that the hammer is fully forward, then insert a 1/8 allen wrench into this top hole. It should go clear through the bolt chamber and down into the second tube where it will go into a hole in the top of the hammer. It may take some experimentation to get the allen into the hammer correctly. Once you have simply unscrew it till you see that the lug can clear that slot in the body. At that point the hammer should simply slide out the back of your marker.

Additional Information: Often your hammer will be resting slightly out of line with the adjustment hole. If you can't get your allen key to sit into the top of the hammer, try pushing the hammer backwards or forwards slightly (you can reach the hammer through the back tube or through the slot the lug goes into. -Thanks to Castro #66

Additional Information: If your sniper is already nicely tuned, then make sure you take note of how many turns you unscrew the lug on the hammer when you are removing it. When you reassemble the sniper, you can simply screw it down that many turns and skip the step of having to adjust the lug length. -Thanks to ApoC 101

The hammer hiding in the back of the bottom tube

The hole on the top I mentioned

The lug extending into the body slot I mentioned

A 1/8 allen adjusting the lug in the hammer

Then the hammer falls right out


Step 10: Removing your valve setscrew.
This is another fairly easy step. Simply look at the bottom of your marker, and just in front of the slot where the hammer's lug was you should see a small screw in the body. This screw keeps the valve front rotating in the body and locks it into place. Simply use a 5/32 allen wrench (some screws might require a different size) and remove this screw.

The set screw

Removing it with a 5/32 allen wrench

The set screw taken out of the body



Step 11: Removing your valve.
This is the home stretch, this is one of the trickest parts of the assembly/disassembly process for many people. Take your autococker valve tool that I mentioned in the begining of the tutorial. Now insert it into the lower tube and slowly spin it while pushing it until you feel it seat into something. If you look through the lug slot in the body you should see the head of the tool settle against the VERY front of that lug slot. Now you need to turn your valve tool a few times to unscrew the nut which is holding the valve in. When you feel like the tool isn't coming out any more when you unscrew then wiggle it a few times, turn your entire marker to point at the ceiling and pull the tool back out (so the head of it is facing straight up). If you're lucky your entire valve assembly and jamnut will have come out in one piece. If you're not then you'll just get the jam nut and the valve will still be in there. If you fall into the latter category then try shaking the body a bit and banging the front of it with your hand to try to knock the valve loose. Be warned that when it DOES come loose the valve spring will probably be loose of the valve as well so your valve might come out in two or three pieces.

The valve tool you'll be using

Inserting the valve tool

The valve tool seating in the jam nut

The valve assembly & jam nut coming out in one complete piece (if you're lucky)

The valve coming out in pieces

The valve assembly after it has been removed
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Old 11-05-2008, 02:22 PM #3
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THE INTERNALS OF YOUR SNIPER

An exploded view of all the parts inside your sniper with each piece labled


The internals assembled roughly how they would be inside of your sniper


Explanation of the parts (in alphabetical order)

Backblock: The backblock screws onto the pump arm of your sniper. It's purpose is to link the bolt and cocking rod together so when the bolt moves back, the cocking rod is moved back as well. The design allows the cocking rod (and thus the hammer it is attached to) to move backward and then stay cocked back independent of the bolt or backblock itself.

Bolt: The bolt serves several purposes. It is an air passage through which air can is routed from the valve forward to the paintball. It also loads each paintball into the firing position. When it is moved back it allows a paintball to drop into the breech then when it moves forward again it moves the paintball into the firing position. It should be noted that this firing position is PAST the ball detent and at the very base of the barrel. (The ball detent only serves to prevent additional balls from entering the breech when the bolt is back)

Cocking Rod: The cocking rod screws into the back of the hammer and only serves to connect the hammer to the entire backblock/bolt assembly. When the bolt and backblock move back, they pull the cocking rod back as well (and by extension the hammer which the cocking rod is screwed into).

Cupseal: The cupseal is part of the valve assembly. It's purpose is to make a seal against the valve and prevent airflow whenever it is against the valve. When the valve opens the cupseal is pushed back away from the valve momentarily (allowing a small amount of air into the valve) before the valve spring pushes the cupseal against the valve again closing off airflow.

Hammer: The hammer's purpose is to strike the valve momentarily opening it and allowing a small amount of air through before the valve spring on the opposite side of the valve from the hammer closes the valve again. The hammer is pulled back against the main spring by the cocking rod and held in place by it's lug which catches on the trigger. When the trigger is released the main spring propels the hammer forward and into the valve.

IVG: The IVG is a small adjustable stop that holds the main spring in. Adjusting how far this IVG is screwed in adjusts the amount of tension on the main spring. By adjusting the tension on the main spring we can make the hammer hit the valve harder and thus open longer.

Jam Nut: The Jam nut fits around one end of the valve and prevents it from moving or rotating when the valve is struck by the hammer. The Jam nut also ends roughly at the same place as the tip of the valve and gives the hammer more surface area to strike against at the end of it's reach thus lessening the wear on the valve and the hammer.


Main Spring: The main spring fits between the hammer and the IVG and serves to propel the hammer into the valve. The IVG can be screwed into add tension to the main spring and thus make it exert more pressure on the hammer, which will consequently strike the valve harder. The main spring is the opposite of the valve spring and the two must be balanced carefully. If the main spring is too strong compared to the valve spring it will hold the valve open all the time. The main spring should only be able to move the valve spring when it is compressed and released against it.

Valve: The valve is actually two pieces set within one another, the valve body and the valve stem. The valve body is the outer piece with the gas holes and the valve stem which the cupseal attaches to and which is struck open by the hammer. The valve acts as an on/off for the airflow in the marker. Behind the cupseal is all the air pressure going into the marker. The valve briefly opens and then quickly closes again to allow small amounts of air through the marker to fire a paintball.

Valve Retainer Screw: The valve retainer screw basically the same thing as the Jam nut and serves as additional protection against the valve rotating or moving when it is struck by the hammer. This screw fits into a recessed air of the valve (or one of the valve air holes depending on the model) and keeps the air hole on the opposite side of the valve pointing the right direction (which is up toward the bolt).

Valve Sping: The valve spring fits against the cupseal and serves to close the close the valve again after it is struck open by the hammer. Valve springs are the opposite of main springs and the two must be balanced carefully. The valve spring must be strong enough in comparision to the main spring to stay closed against against the regular pressure of the hammer & main spring. It should only open briefly when the main spring / hammer are compressed & then released against it.
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Old 11-05-2008, 02:23 PM #4
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REASSEMBLING YOUR SNIPER

Step 1: Assembling your valve
The first thing we need to do when reassembling your sniper is look at your valve. It should have either two holes on either side or a hole on one side and an indention on the other. It is extremely important that the hole (either one if you have a two hole variety) is pointing UPWARD towards the bolt in the chamber. In order for that to happen we must first reassemble the valve assembly on our valve tool. To do that first stick the jam nut around the head of the valve tool. Then stick the neck of the valve body (the tube end) into the hole in head of the valve tool. Next stick your cupseal into the valve body stick end first so the head rests against the valve. Finally put the valve spring on the end of the cupseal (in some valves it may not fit on securely and will have to be balanced on there carefully until it is securely inside the body).

Your valve assembly should look something like this when it's ready to install



Step 2: Installing your valve
Now carefully slide your valve assembly into the back of the lower tube of your sniper. If your valve spring isn't securely attached to the cupseal then I find it helps to point the whole valve assembly up and lower the body down ONTO the valve assembly and tool. Once your valve is fully seated turn the valve tool one full turn. Now look at the hole where your valve setscrew belongs. You should see your valve through that hole. As you turn the valve tool you should see the valve rotating through the hole and you should see either the two holes or the hole and the indention. Before you have finished screwing the valve in you should take an allen wrench and press against the indention or one of the two holes (depending on your valve style) to keep it from rotating around. This will ensure that the airhole of your valve is pointed up like it needs to be once installation is complete. Once you're holding the bottom of the valve to ensure it's orientation, finish screwing the valve assembly in with the valve tool. Once you've tightened it down you'll notice the valve won't be able to rotate anymore (why we made sure it was aligned before we tightened it)

The valve assembly going into the body

The indention of the valve visible through the valve setscrew hole

Holding the indention with an allen wrench to keep the valve aligned.



Step 3: Installing your valve setscrew
Now that your valve is installed and properly oriented you need to installed the valve setscrew again. The indention or hole should be pointed down and the setscrew should rest against it and stop the valve from being able to rotate even if the jam nut were to come loose.

Your valve setscrew

The valve setscrew screwed in



Step 4: Installing your hammer
Your hammer is another piece that needs to be aligned when you are installing it. You have to make sure the side with the lug is facing downward and the side with the hex hole is facing upward. Also the flat face of the hammer should be facing in towards the valve we already installed. Once you have it aligned right, slide the valve into the body. Look at the valve through the slot the lug goes in and make sure the lug is aligned over that slot. Once it is, insert an allen wrench in from the top (just like we did during disassembly) and screw the lug down into the slot. You want to be careful that you don't move the lug too far of the trigger won't be able to go low enough to release the lug. About 1/2 into the slot is usually a good distance to start. Note: If you're having trouble getting the hammer rotated correctly try screwing the cocking rod into it and using that to guide the hammer. Once the lug is down you should be able to easily remove the cocking rod and continue with the reassembly process.

The allen hole side which should face up

The lug side which should face down

Inserting the hammer

Lowering the hammer lug

The lug lowered into the slot




Step 5: Installing your mainspring
This is easy enough. Just drop the main spring in behind the hammer. The only thing you need to make sure of is that it is centered in the hammer and not resting on out of the outside edges.

Just drop it in and make sure it's centered on the hammer


Step 6: Installing your IVG
Another easy step. All you have to do is screw it in right behind the main spring. Just like with the hammer, make sure the mainspring is centered on the IVG and not resting on one of the edges

Set it on the back of the body and thread it in one turn or so with your fingers

Then just tighten it down the rest of the way with an allen wrench

Fully installed. How deep you screw it in will depend on your marker & the desired velocity


Step 7: Installing your pump handle
Another easy step. Just slide this pump handle right onto the guide rods on the front of the marker

Just slide it right onto the pump guide


Step 8: Backblock
Yet another easy step! We're almost done. Just screw the backblock onto your pump rod with your fingers.

Just screw it onto the rod coming from the pump handle with your fingers


Step 9: Installing your bolt & cocking rod
I combined these two because they're pretty self-explanatory. Screw the cocking rod into the bottom tube. Slide the bolt into the top tube then put the pull pin into it.

Need I say more?
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Old 11-05-2008, 02:24 PM #5
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Step 10: Installing your trigger frame
Set the frame against the marker and use your fingers to put the screws in and tighten them as much as you can (without using tools JUST your fingers). Don't tighten these screws down with allen wrenches yet as we might have to take the frame off to make adjustments very soon!

Tightening the front screw

Tightening the back screw


Step 11: Making sure we adjust the seer lug correctly
This is the last tricky step. While we're doing this step we're going to have to make sure we set the hammer lug correctly. If we didn't screw it out far enough then the trigger won't catch the hammer at all and the marker won't cock. If we screwed it out too far then the trigger won't be able to drop low enough to release the hammer and the gun won't fire after cocked. First of all try to cock the marker by pulling the cocking rod back. Next try to fire the gun by pulling the trigger. If your marker either didn't cock (the cocking rod sprung all the way back forward without catching on the trigger) or your marker wouldn't fire (pulling the trigger didn't let the cocking rod go forward). We have to readjust the hammer lug. Thankfully this is pretty easy to do. Simply remove the bolt take off your trigger frame and stick a 1/8 allen wrench in to adjust the hammer again. If it didn't cock at all move the lug down farther into the slot. If it didn't fire at all move the lug back up into the slot. Now just reinstall your trigger frame and try this step again. Keep playing with it until you find a setting that both reliably fires the marker and gives you a comfortable trigger pull.

Pulling back the cocking rod

Pulling the trigger.


Step 12: Cleaning up
With your hammer lug adjusted correctly your marker should be completely reassembled now. You'll want to use an allen wrench to tighten your trigger frame screws down now (just give them a firm press. do NOT over tighten them) since we're done adjusting the hammer lug. You also might want to reinstall your macro tubing, regulator, or bottom line if you removed it during disassembly or reassembly. Finally you might have to play around with how far you screw in your IVG since you will likely have it at a different setting then you did when you disassembled the marker. Further tuning & trouble shooting will be coming soon, but for most people this should be everything you need!
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Old 11-05-2008, 03:01 PM #6
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Another good reference with pictures. (Not Mine)

http://www.pettypb.com/sniclone.htm

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Old 11-06-2008, 12:10 AM #7
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TUNING YOUR SNIPER


Sweet-spotting your regulator
Every regulator you use on a sniper will perform differently. Likewise, the exact same regulator will perform differently on two different snipers. Two of the same brand of regulator can even be different enough to require unique tuning on the SAME sniper.

Regulators have an ideal pressure at which they are the most consistent. This is the point where the regulator is balance and not stressed internally and it is not over-pressurizing or giving insufficient pressure to the internals. This ideal pressure, which is generally called the sweet spot is the perfect place to start tuning your sniper.

A sweet-spotted regulator will usually be more consistent in it's output pressure (i.e. more consistent velocities over the chronograph) and help a sniper be more efficient (i.e. more shots out of a tank)

Step 1:
To sweet-spot your sniper we will need a few items.
-Your Sniper
-Your barrel (ideally a close match to the paint you're using)
-A set of tools to adjust the output pressure of your regulator (typically a set of allen keys, but this can vary from regulator to regulator)
-A full tank of HPA or CO2
-A full bag of paint OUT of hopper
-A chronograph
-A gauge to show your regs output pressure (optional, but very helpful)

Step 2:
First of all assemble your sniper, barrel, & air tank with NO paint or hopper.

Now turn the pressure on your regulator ALL the way down. If you're unsure about how to do this search for a manual for your regulator online. Many will have a PDF file somewhere on the manufacturers site that explains how to adjust your regulator.

Do NOT assume that just because you're turning it one direction and the balls are shooting slower that you are turning the pressure DOWN. This is made much easier if you have a gauge that shows your regs output pressure.

Step 3:
Once your regulator is turned down all the way turn it up a small amount (1/4 turn on the adjustment or 50 psi if you have a guage).

Once you have turned your reg up a small amount, dry fire the marker (just with air and no paint) 5 or 10 times. What dry firing does is lets the regulator's new setting seat itself and get settled.

Once your regulator is settled at it's new setting, feed a few paintballs into the marker by hand and fire them over the chronograph. Now figure out the rough average of their velocity.

Step 4:
Now we will be repeating step 3 as many times as necessary.
-Turn the regulator up a small amount
-Dry fire 5~10 times
-Fire a few paintballs over the chronograph.
We will need to continue these steps until the velocity STOPS increasing when we turn the regulator pressure up.

Step 5:
Once we have found the point at which the velocity STOPS increasing with the regulator pressure we will start fine tuning. Again we will be repeating step 3 but slightly altered, we will now be adjusting by smaller increments (1/8 of a turn or 25psi if you have a gauge).
-Turn the regulator back down a very small amount (because we've likely overshot the ideal spot when we were making large adjustments).
-Dry fire 5~10 times
-Fire a few paintballs over the chronograph.

Step 6:
Continue adjust the velocity up and down in this manner until you've found the exact point at which the the velocity starts to decrease when you turn the air pressure up. This point is what is called the sweet spot.

That concludes finding the sweet-spot of your regulator. Unless your performing advanced tuning (i.e. trying to run extremely low pressure or tuning for 12 grams) you can be fairly confident that this is the ideal pressure for your regulator/sniper. You can now use this pressure as a baseline to make adjustments to the rest of your sniper. Don't worry if your sniper is firing well over or under legal velocity at it's sweet spot. We will correct this velocity through springing in the next section
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Old 11-06-2008, 04:17 AM #8
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wooowwwww super kudos! in behalf of all the new and future pump players, i thank you with this internet fruitbasket. =]
Hey, call it what you will, but you posted here too, pal...

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Old 11-06-2008, 04:58 AM #9
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When I take the hammer out, after I take the IVG, and spring out I screw the cocking rod back in. Then I use the cocking rod to move the hammer to line the lug up. I do the same when putting it back in so I don't have to very carefully drop it in, and "Damn it...Damn it...Damn it...Damn it...****...Damn it."

It helps...
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Old 11-06-2008, 08:58 AM #10
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nice job, very helpful
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Old 11-06-2008, 09:23 AM #11
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I also use the cocking rod (or whatever I have around in the case of a halfblock) to get at the hammer lug. Makes things SO much easier.
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Old 11-06-2008, 11:53 AM #12
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I also use the cocking rod (or whatever I have around in the case of a halfblock) to get at the hammer lug. Makes things SO much easier.
a CCM beavertail also works if you don't have a cocking rod. thats what I use for my halfblock to line it up
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Old 11-06-2008, 03:28 PM #13
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i might be asking too much but a video would be great for the more "visual" learners like myself. just to make sure we are doing it right.
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Old 11-11-2008, 08:51 PM #14
WarHamster
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Springing your sniper
There are three variables to consider when springing your sniper. The strength of the main spring, the strength of the valve spring, and the input pressure (from the regulator or air source directly). We will first address how each of these variables can affect a sniper. Then in the next section we will walk through a basic springing and discuss tips for specialized springing such as running off of 12 grams.

The main spring: As stated earlier in the tutorial the main spring propels the hammer forward into the valve and opens it to allow air to pass through. The main spring can affect many aspects of your sniper. Key amongst them are:
-Your pump stroke: When ever you pump your marker you’re pushing against three forces, friction, the return spring, and the main spring. By reducing the strength of this spring you can achieve the feathery light buttery smooth pump strokes people rave about on their CCM markers (keeping the pump handle, guide rods, and marker clean also helps a great deal).
-Your velocity: The strength of your main spring partially determines how long the valve will stay open with each shot. The harder the main spring strikes the valve, the farther back the valve stem will travel and the longer the valve will stay open (allowing more air to pass through). Installing a harder main spring will typically increase the velocity your marker fires at.
-Farting: With some snipers after the hammer strikes the valve it will be pushed back hard enough by the valve spring to compress the main spring a second time and simulate a second smaller shot by reopening the valve a second or third time. This effect is called “farting” and makes a very loud and distinctive sound for which it is named. A harder main spring can help ensure that the hammer is unable to compress the main spring enough on its travel back to reopen the valve.
-Venting: With some snipers they will always drain extra air down the barrel with each shot resulting in wasted efficiency end extra noise. In extreme cases this venting will happen WHENEVER the marker is not cocked. This is because the main spring is too strong and is holding the valve open too long allowing too much air to escape. In the extreme cases where it leaks whenever it is uncocked, it is because the main spring is so strong it is forcing the hammer to hold the valve open except when the hammer is pulled back to be cocked.

The valve spring: As stated earlier in the tutorial the valve spring holds the cupseal closed against the valve, prevents air from escaping except when the marker fires, and closes the valve again after each shot. The aspects of your sniper which your valve spring can affect are as follows:
-Your velocity: The strength of your valve spring also helps determine how long the valve will stay open with each shot. The stronger the valve spring, the faster the valve will close. Thus strong valve springs allow less air and lower the velocity. This is generally the most difficult way to modify your velocity and should only be changed to keep a balance with your main spring (so prevent the farting or venting discussed above).
-Farting: As discussed above, farting is when a hammer, on its return, bounces back against the valve a second or third time. This reopens the valve and allows excess air to escape resulting in the sound for which it is named. A weaker valve spring will reduce how hard the hammer returns against the main spring and decrease the likelihood of it accidentally reopening the valve.
-Venting: As discussed above, venting is when a hammer is holding the valve open for too long during a shot or during extreme cases all the time. This allows too much air to escape killing efficiency and creating excess noise. A stronger valve spring can hold the valve shut and ensure it doesn’t open except when it is supposed to.


The input pressure: The input pressure from your air supply either regulated or not is the last variable in your tuning balance. If you’re running a screw in tank, twelve grams, or a CO2 tank WITHOUT a regulator then this is not an adjustable variable and you will simply have to work around it with the main and valve springs. If you do happen to have a regulator or an adjustable output tank however, you have a bit more leeway in adjusting your sniper. The aspects which your input pressure can affect are as follows:
-Your velocity: Your regulator can increase or decrease your markers velocity. Generally speaking as you increase the pressure of the regulator you will see a bell-curve of the velocity increasing, peaking, and then decreasing. As the velocity is still increasing there is less then an ideal amount of pressure but the marker is still operational (albeit at a slightly decreased consistency due to the less than optimal output pressure). As the velocity is decreasing, there is too much pressure and it is causing the valve to snap shut too fast by putting too much pressure on from the outside. Again technically the marker will work fine, albeit at a slightly decreased consistency due to the less than optimal output pressure.
-Farting: As discussed above, farting is when a hammer, on its return, bounces back against the valve a second or third time. This reopens the valve and allows excess air to escape resulting in the sound for which it is named. Decreasing the input pressure can help compensate for farting by reducing how hard the hammer springs back and reducing the likelihood of the valve reopening a second time.
-Venting: As previously discussed venting is when a hammer is holding the valve open for too long during a shot or during extreme cases all the time. This allows too much air to escape killing efficiency and creating excess noise. Increasing regulator pressure can help compensate for venting by increasing the resistance against the hammer and main spring allowing the valve to stay closed.


MORE SPRINGING COMING SOON
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Last edited by WarHamster : 04-27-2009 at 06:52 PM.
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Old 11-11-2008, 10:09 PM #15
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Old 11-12-2008, 06:00 PM #16
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sticky vote get.
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Old 11-12-2008, 06:07 PM #17
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Old 12-10-2008, 12:56 PM #18
WarHamster
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Added a regulator sweet spotting guide to the tuning section. I'm about 1/2 done with the springing guide and I'll be finishing it in the next few days.

I think this guide is mostly done beyond that... Anyone else have any other suggestions?
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Old 12-10-2008, 01:49 PM #19
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Sticky it.

Pogi - if you need a video - you are a little lost and need to sell your marker.

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Old 12-10-2008, 02:31 PM #20
oggfueler
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Very nice. You get a fat

WarHamster... Caring for the newbs and tuning challenged!
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Old 12-10-2008, 02:49 PM #21
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things to add:

-when removing the backblock, it is not necessary to totally unscrew it... simply rotating it 180 degrees will allow you to slide the pump handle off, with the pump rod and the backblock still attached.

-when removing the hammer, it is best to unscrew the lug say, 3 complete turns, so when you re-install it you don't have to re-tune it, just screw it back in the same amount of complete turns.

-you can also apply that technique with the IVG, to re-install it without losing your velocity setting. I usually check its position with a micrometer, but counting the turns works well enough.

Last edited by ApoC_101 : 12-10-2008 at 02:51 PM.
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