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Old 03-12-2008, 12:07 PM #22
Frank112916
 
 
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Actually technically, the American dollar is artificially strong considering it's almost common currency throughout the world, especially in Finance. It is starting to weaken due to our economic situation and the emergence of the incredibly strong Euro. It's been unusual that a government has been able to spend with such a deficit, but this is due to our artificially strong currency.

The US is in a big correction right now. The housing market is correcting itself, banks have overstretched their funds and become greedy. The short sighted behavior of lending to those who can't repay has destroyed lenders credibility. Now with the mono-line downgrades that are happening rates are still being increased, which has hit municipalities who are running on borrowed money hard.

I don't think the situation is quite as simple as you make it seem. It's much more complex and I think this is giving people the wrong ideas. People aren't really electing politicians who want to enact trade barriers because they are quote "afraid of differences." They are electing these officials to protect their jobs in the here and now. While any economist will tell you that the jobs lost to free trade today will be exceeded by the jobs created down the line, the voters are the ones who are going to loose their jobs. The Unskilled worker who is paid a minimum wage can't compete with those in other countries who get paid a dollar a day to do the same thing. These are the same people who are voting protectionist politicians into power.

It's not banks which drive political policy today, it's more simply put, money. Money drives political policy. In the US we have political Lobbyists who pour billions of dollars into the bank accounts of politicians to support their cause. America is also a nation of special interest groups. Policy is many times created by those who cry the loudest, not necessarily the majority.

The political and economic view you are espousing is far too complex to be summed up in less than a page of text. It's far to glib and your post simply does not do the argument any justice. While I feel you have the right intentions at heart I really just don't get anything from your post. There is little fact and much more "opinion." Op/Ed pieces still need to contain at least arguable facts and statistics to back up what you are saying.
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Old 03-12-2008, 12:08 PM #23
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My opinion is kept to myself. I was asking the question not answering it.
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Old 03-12-2008, 12:16 PM #24
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My opinion is kept to myself. I was asking the question not answering it.
huh? what the hell are you talking about?
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Old 03-12-2008, 06:18 PM #25
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The Grapes of Wrath was written at the height of the great depression. If there ever was a time to consider socialism as an alternative to capitalism, I'd say during the era of the utter failure of the capitalist system would be a good one. Not that I agree that banks were monsters, it's just that banks sometimes make short sighted decisions regarding lending practices.
I'm sorry if I made you think I thought they were monsters, I dont as banking has been in my family for more generations than we can remember (a very long time). And some have been involved in... shady practices, but hey: the fruit that is harvested shalt not define the tree.


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Capitalism didn't 'fail us' during the Depression, it could have pulled us out sooner if FDR would have let it.
FDR did pull us out of the Depression, if Hoover had been allowed to stay in office who knows what could have happened. But the New Deal failed and the Second one didnt help out too much either. But these are opinions, based on facts that I have been presented with. In other words, dont take it from me do some reading!

And the Grapes of Wrath is a great book and all, but I put it on the same level as the movie Citizen Kane in the boring department.



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Old 03-13-2008, 01:28 AM #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank112916 View Post
Actually technically, the American dollar is artificially strong considering it's almost common currency throughout the world, especially in Finance. It is starting to weaken due to our economic situation and the emergence of the incredibly strong Euro. It's been unusual that a government has been able to spend with such a deficit, but this is due to our artificially strong currency.

The US is in a big correction right now. The housing market is correcting itself, banks have overstretched their funds and become greedy. The short sighted behavior of lending to those who can't repay has destroyed lenders credibility. Now with the mono-line downgrades that are happening rates are still being increased, which has hit municipalities who are running on borrowed money hard.

I don't think the situation is quite as simple as you make it seem. It's much more complex and I think this is giving people the wrong ideas. People aren't really electing politicians who want to enact trade barriers because they are quote "afraid of differences." They are electing these officials to protect their jobs in the here and now. While any economist will tell you that the jobs lost to free trade today will be exceeded by the jobs created down the line, the voters are the ones who are going to loose their jobs. The Unskilled worker who is paid a minimum wage can't compete with those in other countries who get paid a dollar a day to do the same thing. These are the same people who are voting protectionist politicians into power.

It's not banks which drive political policy today, it's more simply put, money. Money drives political policy. In the US we have political Lobbyists who pour billions of dollars into the bank accounts of politicians to support their cause. America is also a nation of special interest groups. Policy is many times created by those who cry the loudest, not necessarily the majority.

The political and economic view you are espousing is far too complex to be summed up in less than a page of text. It's far to glib and your post simply does not do the argument any justice. While I feel you have the right intentions at heart I really just don't get anything from your post. There is little fact and much more "opinion." Op/Ed pieces still need to contain at least arguable facts and statistics to back up what you are saying.
Yes, yes, and I didn't feel like allocating a couple hours to integrate sources in my post as you wish I did. It was simply a summation of reports I have gone through, and in this case without marking them down for later citation. Current data will suggest I'm in the right direction with my point. When I say summation, I don't mean plagiarism though.

Calling banks the driving force of the world economies and governments is very accurate. Sure, money drives the economic engines of the entire world, but those with the most money to invest are the ones who have the most influence. To ignore the parts banks plays, and simply say "money" drives the world would be an extension into overly vague ways. Sure, there is opinion. Perhaps I guessed incorrectly that anyone commenting on this would be familiar with the data involved. You talk as you do, but let me take a jab since you took a couple swings yourself. You say a lot without saying anything. I don't need a refresher on what is and isn't in today's American culture. I live and breathe the stuff, and quite frankly I get tired of the stuff that is repeated over and over by basic news outlets.
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Old 03-14-2008, 02:33 AM #27
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No.

Fiscal conservatism...
Not neo(new)conservative = Christian Evangelical. Which equals- rule by ideology(i.e. McCain)
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